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Market Structure, Inflation, and Price Dispersion

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  • Mustafa Caglayan
  • Alpay Filiztekin
  • Michael T. Rauh

    ()

Abstract

In this paper, we investigate the impact of market structure on the relationship between inflation and price dispersion. We first propose a new empirical model of the relationship between inflation and dispersion with firmer theoretical foundations, and then extend the basic model to incorporate the potential effects of market structure. We estimate the basic and market structure specifications using a unique micro-level data set from Istanbul, which consists of monthly price observations from three different store types: convenience stores, open-air markets, and supermarkets. Our empirical findings support almost all of the basic and market structure predictions.

Suggested Citation

  • Mustafa Caglayan & Alpay Filiztekin & Michael T. Rauh, 2004. "Market Structure, Inflation, and Price Dispersion," Discussion Papers in Economics 04/2, Department of Economics, University of Leicester, revised Jun 2004.
  • Handle: RePEc:lec:leecon:04/2
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Roland Benabou, 1992. "Inflation and Efficiency in Search Markets," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 59(2), pages 299-329.
    2. Reinganum, Jennifer F, 1979. "A Simple Model of Equilibrium Price Dispersion," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(4), pages 851-858, August.
    3. Roland Benabou, 1988. "Search, Price Setting and Inflation," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 55(3), pages 353-376.
    4. Caglayan, Mustafa & Filiztekin, Alpay, 2003. "Nonlinear impact of inflation on relative price variability," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 213-218, May.
    5. Parsley, David C, 1996. "Inflation and Relative Price Variability in the Short and Long Run: New Evidence from the United States," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 28(3), pages 323-341, August.
    6. Lach, Saul & Tsiddon, Daniel, 1992. "The Behavior of Prices and Inflation: An Empirical Analysis of Disaggregated Price Data," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(2), pages 349-389, April.
    7. Eytan Sheshinski & Yoram Weiss, 1977. "Inflation and Costs of Price Adjustment," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 44(2), pages 287-303.
    8. Eytan Sheshinski & Yoram Weiss, 1983. "Optimum Pricing Policy under Stochastic Inflation," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 50(3), pages 513-529.
    9. Mariano Tommasi, 1992. "Inflation and Relative Prices Evidence from Argentina," UCLA Economics Working Papers 661, UCLA Department of Economics.
    10. Parks, Richard W, 1978. "Inflation and Relative Price Variability," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(1), pages 79-95, February.
    11. Debelle, Guy & Lamont, Owen, 1997. "Relative Price Variability and Inflation: Evidence from U.S. Cities," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(1), pages 132-152, February.
    12. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
    13. Dana, James D, Jr, 1994. "Learning in an Equilibrium Search Model," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 35(3), pages 745-771, August.
    14. Jaramillo, Carlos Felipe, 1999. "Inflation and Relative Price Variability: Reinstating Parks' Results," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 31(3), pages 375-385, August.
    15. Van Hoomissen, Theresa, 1988. "Price Dispersion and Inflation: Evidence from Israel," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(6), pages 1303-1314, December.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    inflation; market structure; menu cost models; micro panel data; price dispersion;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • D40 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - General
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation

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