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Learning in an Equilibrium Search Model


  • Dana, J.D.


This paper explores the role of learning in an equilibrium search model with asymmetric information. Firms with identical but privately observed marginal cost sell a homogeneous good to heterogeneously informed consumers. A reservation-price equilibrium exists if the uninformed consumers' search cost is sufficiently large. In this equilibrium, the amount of price dispersion is inversely related to the realization of marginal cost. Also, the average price level is less responsive to cost changes than when cost is observable. Finally, uncertainty about firms' marginal cost increases the expected price level. Copyright 1994 by Economics Department of the University of Pennsylvania and the Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association.
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Suggested Citation

  • Dana, J.D., 1991. "Learning in an Equilibrium Search Model," Papers 37, Stanford - Institute for Thoretical Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:stante:37

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    Cited by:

    1. Jun Honda, 2015. "Intermediary Search for Suppliers in Procurement Auctions," Department of Economics Working Papers wuwp203, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Department of Economics.
    2. McCarthy, Ian M., 2016. "Advertising intensity and welfare in an equilibrium search model," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 20-26.
    3. Caglayan, Mustafa & Filiztekin, Alpay & Rauh, Michael T., 2008. "Inflation, price dispersion, and market structure," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(7), pages 1187-1208, October.
    4. Michael R. Baye & John Morgan, 2009. "Brand and Price Advertising in Online Markets," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 55(7), pages 1139-1151, July.
    5. Michael R. Baye & J. Rupert J. Gatti & Paul Kattuman & John Morgan, 2009. "Clicks, Discontinuities, and Firm Demand Online," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(4), pages 935-975, December.
    6. Rauh, Michael T., 1997. "A Model of Temporary Search Market Equilibrium," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 128-153, November.
    7. Michael R. Baye & John Morgan & Patrick Scholten, 2006. "Information, Search, and Price Dispersion," Working Papers 2006-11, Indiana University, Kelley School of Business, Department of Business Economics and Public Policy.
    8. Alexei Parakhonyak, 2014. "Oligopolistic Competition and Search Without Priors," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0(576), pages 594-606, May.
    9. Azar, Ofer H., 2008. "The effect of relative thinking on firm strategy and market outcomes: A location differentiation model with endogenous transportation costs," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 684-697, November.
    10. Sinitsyn, Maxim, 2009. "Price dispersion in duopolies with heterogeneous consumers," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 197-205, March.
    11. Avi Weiss & Joshua Sherman, 2014. "An Empirical Analysis of Search Costs and Price Dispersion," Working Papers 2014-06, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
    12. Roberto Burguet & Vaiva Petrikaite, 2017. "Targeted Advertising and Costly Consumer Search," Working Papers 971, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    13. Sinitsyn, Maxim, 2008. "Characterization of the support of the mixed strategy price equilibria in oligopolies with heterogeneous consumers," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 99(2), pages 242-245, May.
    14. Mustafa Caglayan & Alpay Filiztekin & Michael T. Rauh, 2003. "Market Structure, Inflation, and Price Dispersion," Research Papers 2003_03, University of Liverpool Management School, revised 28 Apr 2004.
    15. Ginger Jin & Andrew Kato, 2004. "Consumer frauds and the uninformed: Evidence from an online field experiment," Natural Field Experiments 00275, The Field Experiments Website.
    16. Honda, Jun, 2015. "Intermediary Search for Suppliers in Procurement Auctions," Department of Economics Working Paper Series 4628, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    17. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:4:p:1898-1918 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Rauh, Michael T., 2009. "Strategic complementarities and search market equilibrium," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 959-978, July.
    19. Michael R. Baye & John Morgan, 2001. "Information Gatekeepers on the Internet and the Competitiveness of Homogeneous Product Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(3), pages 454-474, June.
    20. Randy A. Nelson & Richard Cohen & Frederik Roy Rasmussen, 2007. "An Analysis of Pricing Strategy and Price Dispersion on the Internet," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 33(1), pages 95-110, Winter.
    21. S. Dupraz, 2017. "A Kinked-Demand Theory of Price Rigidity," Working papers 656, Banque de France.
    22. Michael R. Baye & John Morgan, 2005. "Probabilistic Patents," Microeconomics 0504004, EconWPA.
    23. Maarten Janssen & Paul Pichler & Simon Weidenholzer, 2009. "Sequential Search with Incompletely Informed Consumers: Theory and Evidence from Retail Gasoline Markets," Vienna Economics Papers 0914, University of Vienna, Department of Economics.
    24. repec:eee:jetheo:v:172:y:2017:i:c:p:120-162 is not listed on IDEAS


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