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Risk-Free Bond Prices in Incomplete Markets with Recursive Utility Functions and Multiple Beliefs

Author

Listed:
  • Chaiki Hara

    (Faculty of Economics and Politics, University of Cambridge)

  • Atsushi Kajii

    (Institute of Economic Research, Kyoto University)

Abstract

We consider an exchange economy under uncertainty, in which agents' utility functions exhibit constant absolute risk aversion, but they may be recursive and the expected utility calculation may be based on multiple subjective beliefs. The risk aversion coefficients, subjective beliefs, subjective time discount factors, initial endowments, and tradeable assets may differ across agents. We prove that the risk-free bond price goes down (and the interest rate goes up) monotonically as the markets become more complete. We find the range of equilibrium bond prices that depends on the primitives of the economy but not on the structures of financial markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Chaiki Hara & Atsushi Kajii, 2004. "Risk-Free Bond Prices in Incomplete Markets with Recursive Utility Functions and Multiple Beliefs," KIER Working Papers 590, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:kyo:wpaper:590
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    File URL: http://www.kier.kyoto-u.ac.jp/DP/DP590.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Calvet, Laurent E., 2001. "Incomplete Markets and Volatility," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 98(2), pages 295-338, June.
    2. Devereux, Michael B. & Saito, Makoto, 1997. "Growth and risk-sharing with incomplete international assets markets," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3-4), pages 453-481, May.
    3. Weil, Philippe, 1992. "Equilibrium asset prices with undiversifiable labor income risk," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 16(3-4), pages 769-790.
    4. Calvet, Laurent & Gonzalez-Eiras, Martín & Sodini, Paolo, 2004. "Financial Innovation, Market Participation, and Asset Prices," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 39(03), pages 431-459, September.
    5. Tyge Nielsen, Lars, 1993. "The expected utility of portfolios of assets," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 439-461.
    6. Epstein, Larry G. & Schneider, Martin, 2003. "Recursive multiple-priors," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 113(1), pages 1-31, November.
    7. Elul, Ronel, 1997. "Financial innovation, precautionary saving and the risk-free rate," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 113-131, February.
    8. Laurent Calvet & Jean-Michel Grandmont & Isabelle Lemaire, 2001. "Aggregation of Heterogenous Beliefs and Asset Pricing in Complete Financial Markets," Working Papers 2001-01, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
    9. Gilboa, Itzhak & Schmeidler, David, 1989. "Maxmin expected utility with non-unique prior," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 141-153, April.
    10. Weil, Philippe, 1989. "The equity premium puzzle and the risk-free rate puzzle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 401-421, November.
    11. Michael Magill & Martine Quinzii, 2002. "Theory of Incomplete Markets, Volume 1," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262632543, January.
    12. Narayana R. Kocherlakota, 1996. "The Equity Premium: It's Still a Puzzle," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(1), pages 42-71, March.
    13. Kreps, David M & Porteus, Evan L, 1978. "Temporal Resolution of Uncertainty and Dynamic Choice Theory," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 185-200, January.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    multiple priors; no trade; dynamic consistency; interim efficiency; rectangularityi;

    JEL classification:

    • D52 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Incomplete Markets
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates

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