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Technology Spillover through Trade and TFP Convergence: 120 Years of Evidence for the OECD Countries

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  • Jakob B. Madsen

    (Institute of Economics, University of Copenhagen)

Abstract

Using a new dataset on imports of technology and total factor productivity (TFP) over more than a century for the OECD countries, this paper tests for international technological transmission through trade. The empirical estimates suggest that imports of knowledge have been responsible for an almost 200% increase in TFP over the past century, but that the spillover effect has been highly unevenly distributed across countries, but has contributed to TFP convergence among the OECD countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Jakob B. Madsen, 2005. "Technology Spillover through Trade and TFP Convergence: 120 Years of Evidence for the OECD Countries," EPRU Working Paper Series 05-01, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kud:epruwp:05-01
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    File URL: http://www.econ.ku.dk/epru/files/wp/wp-05-01.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dominique Guellec & Bruno Van Pottelsberghe de la Potterie, 2004. "From R&D to Productivity Growth: Do the Institutional Settings and the Source of Funds of R&D Matter?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 66(3), pages 353-378, July.
    2. Keller, Wolfgang, 1998. "Are international R&D spillovers trade-related?: Analyzing spillovers among randomly matched trade partners," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(8), pages 1469-1481, September.
    3. Baltagi, Badi H & Griffin, James M, 1984. "Short and Long Run Effects in Pooled Models," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 25(3), pages 631-645, October.
    4. Crespo Jorge & Martín Carmela & Velázquez Francisco J, 2004. "The Role of International Technology Spillovers in the Economic Growth of the OECD Countries," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 4(2), pages 1-20, December.
    5. Guellec, Dominique & Pottelsberghe de la Potterie, Bruno v., 2001. "The internationalisation of technology analysed with patent data," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(8), pages 1253-1266, October.
    6. Lichtenberg, Frank R. & Pottelsberghe de la Potterie, Bruno v., 1998. "International R&D spillovers: A comment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(8), pages 1483-1491, September.
    7. Carlota Perez, 2002. "Technological Revolutions and Financial Capital," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2640.
    8. del Barrio-Castro, Tomas & Lopez-Bazo, Enrique & Serrano-Domingo, Guadalupe, 2002. "New evidence on international R&D spillovers, human capital and productivity in the OECD," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 41-45, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ricardo Bebczuk & Lorena Garegnani, 2007. "Corporate Self-Financing and Economic Growth," Ensayos Económicos, Central Bank of Argentina, Economic Research Department, vol. 1(47), pages 63-91, April - J.
    2. Piermartini, Roberta & Rubínová, Stela, 2014. "Knowledge spillovers through international supply chains," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2014-11, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    3. Jan HAGEMEJER & Tomasz DARAS, "undated". "The long run-effects of the Poland´s accession to the eurozone. Simulation using POLDYN - a dynamic computable general equilibrium model," EcoMod2009 21500037, EcoMod.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    technology spillovers; imports; TFP convergence;

    JEL classification:

    • E13 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Neoclassical
    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • E23 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Production
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights

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