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Gains from Synchronization

Author

Listed:
  • William Barnett

    (Department of Economics, The University of Kansas)

  • Mehmet Dalkir

    (Department of Economics, The University of Kansas)

Abstract

This paper investigates the transmission mechanisms of noise and volatility between economies through trade links, and the effects of synchronization on business cycles. We investigate the transmission of outside noise and the fluctuations that the noise generates. We identify conditions under which international economic links reduce the economic output noise emanating from noise within the individual economies. Under certain conditions, devaluation of a country's currency causes reduction in the business cycle noise and volatility as seen by that country's exporters, while increased valuation of a country's currency produces higher noise and volatility, as seen by the country's importers.

Suggested Citation

  • William Barnett & Mehmet Dalkir, 2005. "Gains from Synchronization," WORKING PAPERS SERIES IN THEORETICAL AND APPLIED ECONOMICS 200511, University of Kansas, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2005.
  • Handle: RePEc:kan:wpaper:200511
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    File URL: http://www.ku.edu/~bgju/2005Papers/200511.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Maurice Obstfeld & Kenneth Rogoff, 2002. "Global Implications of Self-Oriented National Monetary Rules," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(2), pages 503-535.
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    4. Barnett, William A. & Serletis, Apostolos, 2000. "Martingales, nonlinearity, and chaos," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 24(5-7), pages 703-724, June.
    5. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 2003. "Has the business cycle changed?," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 9-56.
    6. Grandmont, Jean-Michel, 1985. "On Endogenous Competitive Business Cycles," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(5), pages 995-1045, September.
    7. Maliar, Lilia & Maliar, Serguei, 2004. "Endogenous Growth And Endogenous Business Cycles," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 8(05), pages 559-581, November.
    8. Selover David D. & Jensen Roderick V. & Kroll John, 2003. "Industrial Sector Mode-Locking and Business Cycle Formation," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 7(3), pages 1-39, October.
    9. Michael D. Bordo & Thomas Helbling, 2003. "Have National Business Cycles Become More Synchronized?," NBER Working Papers 10130, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Feenstra, Robert C, 2002. "Border Effects and the Gravity Equation: Consistent Methods for Estimation," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 49(5), pages 491-506, December.
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    13. Barnett, William A. & He, Yijun, 2002. "Stabilization Policy As Bifurcation Selection: Would Stabilization Policy Work If The Economy Really Were Unstable?," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 6(05), pages 713-747, November.
    14. Glenn Otto & Graham Voss & Luke Willard, 2001. "Understanding OECD Output Correlations," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2001-05, Reserve Bank of Australia.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    business cycles; synchronization; international trade; stochastic systems;

    JEL classification:

    • D5 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium
    • D9 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics
    • E - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics

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