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International Business Cycle Synchronization In Historical Perspective

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  • MICHAEL D. BORDO
  • THOMAS F. HELBLING

Abstract

In this paper, we review and attempt to explain the changes in business cycle synchronization among 16 industrial countries and the over the past century and a quarter, demarcated into four exchange rate regimes. We find that there is a secular trend towards increased synchronization for much of the twentieth century and that it occurs across diverse exchange rate regimes. This finding is in marked contrast to much of the recent literature, which has focused primarily on the evidence for the past 20 or 30 years and which has produced mixed results. We then examine the role of global shocks and shock transmission in the trend toward synchronization. Our key finding here is that global (common) shocks generally are the dominant influence.
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Suggested Citation

  • Michael D. Bordo & Thomas F. Helbling, 2011. "International Business Cycle Synchronization In Historical Perspective," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 79(2), pages 208-238, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:79:y:2011:i:2:p:208-238
    DOI: j.1467-9957.2010.02236.x
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-9957.2010.02236.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Michael D. Bordo & Barry Eichengreen & Jongwoo Kim, 1998. "Was There Really an Earlier Period of International Financial Integration Comparable to Today?," NBER Working Papers 6738, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Michael D. Bordo & Thomas Helbling, 2003. "Have National Business Cycles Become More Synchronized?," NBER Working Papers 10130, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Glenn Otto & Graham Voss & Luke Willard, 2001. "Understanding OECD Output Correlations," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2001-05, Reserve Bank of Australia.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael D. Bordo & John S. Landon-Lane, 2010. "The Global Financial Crisis of 2007-08: Is it Unprecedented?," NBER Working Papers 16589, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Krzysztof Beck, 2016. "Business Cycle Synchronization In European Union: Regional Perspective," Equilibrium. Quarterly Journal of Economics and Economic Policy, Institute of Economic Research, vol. 11(4), pages 785-815, December.
    3. repec:kir:journl:v:5:y:2017:i:1:p:11-24 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. David Matesanz Gomez & Guillermo J. Ortega & Benno Torgler, 2011. "Measuring globalization: A hierarchical network approach," CREMA Working Paper Series 2011-11, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    5. Andrea Bonilla Bolanos, 2014. "An Examination of the Convergence in the Output of South American Countries: The Influence of the Region’s Integration Projects," Working Papers 1424, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique Lyon St-Étienne (GATE Lyon St-Étienne), Université de Lyon.
    6. Selover, David D. & Yagihashi, Takeshi, 2015. "Examining industrial interdependence between Japan and South Korea: A FAVAR approach," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 67-87.
    7. Tiago Trancoso, 2013. "Global macroeconomic interdependence: a minimum spanning tree approach," Review of Applied Socio-Economic Research, Pro Global Science Association, vol. 5(1), pages 179-189, June.
    8. Bekiros Stelios & Nguyen Duc Khuong & Uddin Gazi Salah & Sjö Bo, 2015. "Business cycle (de)synchronization in the aftermath of the global financial crisis: implications for the Euro area," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 19(5), pages 609-624, December.
    9. Ioannis Tsamourgelis & Persa Paflioti & Thomas Vitsounis, 2013. "Seaports Activity (A)synchronicity, Trade Intensity and Business Cycle Convergence: A Panel Data Analysis," International Journal of Maritime, Trade & Economic Issues (IJMTEI), International Journal of Maritime, Trade & Economic Issues (IJMTEI), vol. 0(1), pages 67-92.
    10. Etoundi Atenga, Eric Martial, 2017. "On the Determinants of output Co-movements in the CEMAC Zone:Examining the Role of Trade, Policy Channel, Economic Structure and Common Factors," MPRA Paper 82091, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. María Pía Olivero & Robert Madak, 2013. "Financial integration within Europe and the international transmission of business cycles among industrialized countries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(1), pages 111-122, January.
    12. Andrea Bonilla, 2014. "An Examination of the Convergence in the Output of South American Countries: The Influence of the Region's Integration Projects," Working Papers halshs-01069353, HAL.
    13. repec:krk:eberjl:v:1:y:2013:i:3:p:7-19 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Matthias Morys & Martin Ivanov, 2013. "The emergence of a European region: Business cycles in South-East Europe from political independence to World War II," Centre for Historical Economics and Related Research at York (CHERRY) Discussion Papers 13/01, CHERRY, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    15. Siklos, Pierre L., 2012. "No coupling, no decoupling, only mutual inter-dependence : Business cycles in emerging vs. mature economies," BOFIT Discussion Papers 17/2012, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    16. Karim Barhoumi & Olivier Darné & Laurent Ferrara, 2014. "Dynamic factor models: A review of the literature," OECD Journal: Journal of Business Cycle Measurement and Analysis, OECD Publishing, Centre for International Research on Economic Tendency Surveys, vol. 2013(2), pages 73-107.
    17. Erdenebat Bataa & Denise R.Osborn & Marianne Sensier, 2016. "China's Increasing Global Influence: Changes in International Growth Spillovers," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 221, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    18. repec:rjr:romjef:v::y:2017:i:3:p:130-149 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Krzysztof Beck, 2013. "Structural Similarity as a Determinant of Business Cycle Synchronization in the European Union: A Robust Analysis," Research in Economics and Business: Central and Eastern Europe, Tallinn School of Economics and Business Administration, Tallinn University of Technology, vol. 5(2).
    20. David Matesanz Gomez & Benno Torgler & Guillermo J. Ortega, 2013. "Measuring Global Economic Interdependence: A Hierarchical Network Approach," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(12), pages 1632-1648, December.
    21. Dewally, Michaël & Shao, Yingying, 2013. "Leverage, wholesale funding and national risk attitude," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 179-195.
    22. Luu, Duc Thi & Yanovski, Boyan & Lux, Thomas, 2018. "An analysis of systematic risk in worldwide econonomic sentiment indices," Economics Working Papers 2018-03, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F0 - International Economics - - General
    • N0 - Economic History - - General

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