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Factor decomposition of income inequality change : Japan's regional income disparity from 1955 to 1998

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  • Higashikata, Takayuki

Abstract

We propose a method for the decomposition of inequality changes based on panel data regression. The method is an efficient way to quantify the contributions of variables to changes of the Theil T index while satisfying the property of uniform addition. We illustrate the method using prefectural data from Japan for the period 1955 to 1998. Japan experienced a diminishing of regional income disparity during the years of high economic growth from 1955 to 1973. After estimating production functions using panel data for prefectures in Japan, we apply the new decomposition approach to identify each production factor’s contributions to the changes of per capita income inequality among prefectures. The decomposition results show that total factor productivity (residual) growth, population change (migration), and public capital stock growth contributed to the diminishing of per capita income disparity.

Suggested Citation

  • Higashikata, Takayuki, 2013. "Factor decomposition of income inequality change : Japan's regional income disparity from 1955 to 1998," IDE Discussion Papers 400, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
  • Handle: RePEc:jet:dpaper:dpaper400
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fukao, Kyoji & Yue, Ximing, 2000. "Regional Factor Inputs and Convergence in Japan―How Much Can We Apply Closed Economy Neoclassical Growth Models?―," Economic Review, Hitotsubashi University, vol. 51(2), pages 136-151, April.
    2. Mercedes Sastre & Alain Trannoy, 2002. "Shapley inequality decomposition by factor components: Some methodological issues," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 51-89, December.
    3. Bourguignon, Francois & Fournier, M & Gurgand, M, 2001. "Fast Development with a Stable Income Distribution: Taiwan, 1979-94," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 47(2), pages 139-163, June.
    4. Guanghua Wan & Zhangyue Zhou, 2005. "Income Inequality in Rural China: Regression-based Decomposition Using Household Data," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(1), pages 107-120, February.
    5. Wan, Guanghua, 2004. "Accounting for income inequality in rural China: a regression-based approach," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 348-363, June.
    6. Kai-yuen Tsui, 2007. "Forces Shaping China'S Interprovincial Inequality," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 53(1), pages 60-92, March.
    7. Toshiaki Tachibanaki, 2006. "Inequality And Poverty In Japan," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 57(1), pages 1-27.
    8. Kawaguchi, Daiji & Ohtake, Fumio & Tamada, Keiko, 2009. "The productivity of public capital: Evidence from Japan's 1994 electoral reform," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 332-343, September.
    9. Perotti, Roberto, 1996. "Growth, Income Distribution, and Democracy: What the Data Say," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(2), pages 149-187, June.
    10. Norihiko Yamano & Toru Ohkawara, 2000. "The Regional Allocation of Public Investment: Efficiency or Equity?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 205-229.
    11. Shioji, Etsuro, 2001. "Public Capital and Economic Growth: A Convergence Approach," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 6(3), pages 205-227, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Paul, Saumik & Fukao, Kyoji, 2017. "The Role of Structural Transformation in Regional Productivity Growth and Convergence in Japan: 1874 - 2008," CEI Working Paper Series 2016-12, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    2. Fukao, Kyoji & Paul, Saumik, 2017. "The Role of Structural Transformation in Regional Convergence in Japan: 1874-2008," Discussion Paper Series 665, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Japan; Income distribution; Income inequality; Factor decomposition; Regional disparity;

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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