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Are Pornography and Marriage Substitutes for Young Men?

Author

Listed:
  • Malcolm, Michael

    () (West Chester University of Pennsylvania)

  • Naufal, George S

    () (Texas A&M University)

Abstract

Substitutes for marital sexual gratification may impact the decision to marry. Proliferation of the Internet has made pornography an increasingly low-cost substitute. We investigate the effect of Internet usage, and of pornography consumption specifically, on the marital status of young men. We show that increased Internet usage is negatively associated with marriage formation. Pornography consumption specifically has an even stronger effect. Instrumental variables and a number of robustness checks suggest that the effect is causal.

Suggested Citation

  • Malcolm, Michael & Naufal, George S, 2014. "Are Pornography and Marriage Substitutes for Young Men?," IZA Discussion Papers 8679, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8679
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Samuel Cameron & Alan Collins, 2003. "Estimates of a Model of Male Participation in the Market for Female Heterosexual Prostitution Services," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 271-288, November.
    2. Richard W. Blundell & James L. Powell, 2004. "Endogeneity in Semiparametric Binary Response Models," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 71(3), pages 655-679.
    3. Mark VanLandingham & Somboon Suprasert & Werasit Sittitrai & Chayan Vaddhanaphuti & Nancy Grandjean, 1993. "Sexual activity among never-married men in northern Thailand," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 30(3), pages 297-313, August.
    4. Marina Della Giusta & Maria Laura Di Tommaso & Isilda Shima & Steinar Strøm, 2009. "What money buys: clients of street sex workers in the US," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(18), pages 2261-2277.
    5. Trostel, Philip & Walker, Ian & Woolley, Paul, 2002. "Estimates of the economic return to schooling for 28 countries," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 1-16, February.
    6. Kirk Doran & Joseph Price, 2014. "Pornography and Marriage," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(4), pages 489-498, December.
    7. Marina Giusta & Maria Tommaso & Steinar Strøm, 2009. "Who is watching? The market for prostitution services," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 22(2), pages 501-516, April.
    8. Solon, Gary, 1992. "Intergenerational Income Mobility in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(3), pages 393-408, June.
    9. Steven Stack & Ira Wasserman & Roger Kern, 2004. "Adult Social Bonds and Use of Internet Pornography," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 85(1), pages 75-88.
    10. Lena Edlund & Evelyn Korn, 2002. "A Theory of Prostitution," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(1), pages 181-214, February.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    divorce; marital formation; pornography;

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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