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Does High School Homework Increase Academic Achievement?

Author

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  • Kalenkoski, Charlene M.

    () (Texas Tech University)

  • Pabilonia, Sabrina Wulff

    () (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Abstract

Although previous research has shown that homework improves students' academic achievement, the majority of these studies use data on students' homework time from retrospective questionnaires, which are less accurate than time-diary data. However, most time-diary data sets do not contain outcome measures, and thus are limited in the questions they can answer. One data set that does have both time-diary and outcome information is the combined Child Development Supplement (CDS) and the Transition to Adulthood Survey (TA) of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Students complete time diaries as part of the CDS and then a few years later provide information on outcomes in the TA. The CDS provides us with time diaries for both weekdays and weekend days, providing a good picture of homework over the course of a week rather than on just a single day. For high school graduates, we explore the effects of time spent on homework on two measures of academic achievement: high school GPA and college attendance by age 20. We find that homework time increases the probability of college attendance for boys. In addition, when we look at homework performed as a sole activity, we find that homework increases high school GPA for boys.

Suggested Citation

  • Kalenkoski, Charlene M. & Pabilonia, Sabrina Wulff, 2014. "Does High School Homework Increase Academic Achievement?," IZA Discussion Papers 8142, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8142
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    Cited by:

    1. Chu, Yu-Wei Luke & Gershenson, Seth, 2016. "High Times: The Effect of Medical Marijuana Laws on Student Time Use," IZA Discussion Papers 9887, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Holford, Angus, 2015. "Youth employment and academic performance: production functions and policy effects," ISER Working Paper Series 2015-06, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    GPA; homework; academic achievement; human capital; education;

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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