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Remittances and Household Expenditure Behaviour in Senegal

Author

Listed:
  • Randazzo, Teresa

    () (University of Kent)

  • Piracha, Matloob

    () (University of Kent)

Abstract

This paper analyses the impact of remittances on household expenditure behaviour in Senegal. We use propensity score matching and OLS methods to assess the average impact of remittances on several household budget shares. Our results show a productive use of international remittances in Senegal. However, the impact of remittances disappears when the marginal spending behaviour is considered, i.e., households do not show a different consumption pattern with respect to their remittance status. Therefore, in the decision on how to allocate expenditure, remittances are treated just as any other source of income.

Suggested Citation

  • Randazzo, Teresa & Piracha, Matloob, 2014. "Remittances and Household Expenditure Behaviour in Senegal," IZA Discussion Papers 8106, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8106
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Aubrey D. Tabuga, 2007. "International Remittances and Household Expenditures : The Philippine Case," Development Economics Working Papers 22698, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    2. Paresh Kumar Narayan & Seema Narayan & Sagarika Mishra, 2011. "Do Remittances Induce Inflation? Fresh Evidence from Developing Countries," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 77(4), pages 914-933, April.
    3. Sanket Mohapatra & Dilip Ratha, 2011. "Remittance Markets in Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2292, September.
    4. German A. Zarate-Hoyos, 2004. "Consumption and Remittances in Migrant Households: Toward a Productive Use of Remittances," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 22(4), pages 555-565, October.
    5. Richard Adams, 2011. "Evaluating the Economic Impact of International Remittances On Developing Countries Using Household Surveys: A Literature Review," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(6), pages 809-828.
    6. Alejandra Cox Edwards & Manuelita Ureta, 2003. "International Migration, Remittances, and Schooling: Evidence from El Salvador," NBER Working Papers 9766, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Ralph Chami & Connel Fullenkamp & Samir Jahjah, 2005. "Are Immigrant Remittance Flows a Source of Capital for Development?," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 52(1), pages 55-81, April.
    8. Cristina Cattaneo, 2012. "Migrants’ international transfers and educational expenditure," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 20(1), pages 163-193, January.
    9. Marco Caliendo & Sabine Kopeinig, 2008. "Some Practical Guidance For The Implementation Of Propensity Score Matching," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(1), pages 31-72, February.
    10. Edwards, Alejandra Cox & Ureta, Manuelita, 2003. "International migration, remittances, and schooling: evidence from El Salvador," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 429-461, December.
    11. Rajeev H. Dehejia & Sadek Wahba, 2002. "Propensity Score-Matching Methods For Nonexperimental Causal Studies," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(1), pages 151-161, February.
    12. Adriana Castaldo & Barry Reilly, 2007. "Do Migrant Remittances Affect the Consumption Patterns of Albanian Households?," South-Eastern Europe Journal of Economics, Association of Economic Universities of South and Eastern Europe and the Black Sea Region, vol. 5(1), pages 25-44.
    13. Sascha O. Becker & Andrea Ichino, 2002. "Estimation of average treatment effects based on propensity scores," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 2(4), pages 358-377, November.
    14. Tabuga, Aubrey D., 2007. "International Remittances and Household Expenditures: the Philippine Case," Discussion Papers DP 2007-18, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gabriella Berloffa & Sara Giunti, 2017. "Remittances and healthcare consumption: human capital investment or responses to shocks? Evidence from Peru," DEM Working Papers 2017/12, Department of Economics and Management.
    2. Tebkieta Alexandra TAPSOBA, 2017. "Poverty, disasters and remittances: do remittances and past disasters influence households’ resilience?," Working Papers 201708, CERDI.
    3. Tebkieta Alexandra Tapsoba, 2017. "Poverty, disasters and remittances: do remittances and past disasters influence households’ resilience?," Working Papers halshs-01512716, HAL.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    remittances; household expenditure; Senegal;

    JEL classification:

    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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