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The Effects of the Recent Economic Crisis on Social Protection and Labour Market Arrangements across Socio-Economic Groups

Author

Listed:
  • Basso, Gaetano

    () (University of California, Davis)

  • Dolls, Mathias

    () (Ifo Institute for Economic Research)

  • Eichhorst, Werner

    () (IZA)

  • Leoni, Thomas

    () (WIFO - Austrian Institute of Economic Research)

  • Peichl, Andreas

    () (Ifo Institute for Economic Research)

Abstract

The Great Recession did not only affect European countries to a varying extent, its impact on national labour markets and on specific socio-economic groups in those markets also varied greatly. Institutional arrangements such as employment protection, unemployment insurance benefits and minimum income support, working time flexibility and wage setting played a crucial role in determining to what extent the economic crisis led to higher unemployment, wage cuts or income losses and rising poverty. As the crisis gained momentum, the action of automatic stabilisation mechanisms built into the national tax-benefit and social protection systems was accompanied by heterogeneous sets of discretionary policy measures. While these factors can explain cross-country variation in labour market developments, they also lead to an unequal distribution of economic risks associated with the crisis across socio-economic groups. The present paper aims to investigate and assess to what extent the financial and economic crisis that hit the global economy in 2008-2009 impacted these labour market developments and to what extent different socio-economic groups were affected.

Suggested Citation

  • Basso, Gaetano & Dolls, Mathias & Eichhorst, Werner & Leoni, Thomas & Peichl, Andreas, 2011. "The Effects of the Recent Economic Crisis on Social Protection and Labour Market Arrangements across Socio-Economic Groups," IZA Discussion Papers 6080, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6080
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Katharine G. Abraham & Susan N. Houseman, 1994. "Does Employment Protection Inhibit Labor Market Flexibility? Lessons from Germany, France, and Belgium," NBER Chapters,in: Social Protection versus Economic Flexibility: Is There a Trade-Off?, pages 59-94 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Mathias Dolls & Clemens Fuest & Andreas Peichl, 2011. "Automatic Stabilizers, Economic Crisis and Income Distribution in Europe," Research in Labor Economics,in: Who Loses in the Downturn? Economic Crisis, Employment and Income Distribution, volume 32, pages 227-255 Emerald Publishing Ltd.
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    Cited by:

    1. De Vita, Glauco & Livanos, Ilias & Salotti, Simone, 2014. "Involuntary non-standard employment: evidence from Italian regions," MPRA Paper 58117, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Luisa Natali & Bruno Martorano & Sudhanshu Handa & Goran Holmqvist & Yekaterina Chzhen, 2014. "Trends in Child Well-being in EU Countries during the Great Recession: A cross-country comparative perspective," Papers inwopa730, Innocenti Working Papers.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    tax systems; unemployment protection; automatic stabilisers; Europe; Great Recession;

    JEL classification:

    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • J65 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment Insurance; Severance Pay; Plant Closings
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy

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