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Child-Care and Participation in the Labor Market for Married Women in Mediterranean Countries

Author

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  • Nicodemo, Catia

    () (University of Oxford)

  • Waldmann, Robert

    () (University of Rome Tor Vergata)

Abstract

Parents in the labor force have balance their work and home life, including the choice of the type of care to provide for their children while they work. In this paper we study the connection between the married women's labor force participation, child care arrangements and the time that husbands and wives spent to take care of children in Mediterranean countries. As more women now are in the labor force the interest in the use child care and housework of husband have grown. We use the new database from the EU-SILC (European Survey on Income and Living Conditions) in 2006 and data from the ECHP (European Community Household Panel)in 2001, because these two data-set give us different information about child care and housework. The traditional role of mothers in child care activities is highly valued by many families, especially in Southern European countries. The results show that while Mediterranean countries have advanced in the incorporation of women into the labor market, most of them still have to assume total responsibility for housework and the care of the children. Child care arrangements is an important instrument for women to enter in paid employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicodemo, Catia & Waldmann, Robert, 2009. "Child-Care and Participation in the Labor Market for Married Women in Mediterranean Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 3983, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3983
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Blau, David M & Robins, Philip K, 1988. "Child-Care Costs and Family Labor Supply," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 70(3), pages 374-381, August.
    2. Ribar, David C, 1995. "A Structural Model of Child Care and the Labor Supply of Married Women," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(3), pages 558-597, July.
    3. Windmeijer, F A G & Silva, J M C Santos, 1997. "Endogeneity in Count Data Models: An Application to Demand for Health Care," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(3), pages 281-294, May-June.
    4. Begoña Álvarez & Daniel Miles, 2006. "Husbands’ housework time: does wives’ paid employment make a difference?," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 30(1), pages 5-31, January.
    5. Angrist, Joshua D & Evans, William N, 1998. "Children and Their Parents' Labor Supply: Evidence from Exogenous Variation in Family Size," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 450-477, June.
    6. Cristina Carrasco & Arantxa RodrIguez, 2000. "Women, Families, and Work in Spain: Structural Changes and New Demands," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(1), pages 45-57.
    7. David Blau & PhiliP Robins, 1998. "A dynamic analysis of turnover in employment and child care," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 35(1), pages 83-96, February.
    8. Di Tommaso, Maria Laura, 1999. "A Trivariate Model of Participation, Fertility and Wages: The Italian Case," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(5), pages 623-640, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. World Bank, 2010. "Arab Republic of Egypt : Gender assessment 2010," World Bank Other Operational Studies 3003, The World Bank.
    2. Pau Baizán, 2009. "Regional child care availability and fertility decisions in Spain," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 21(27), pages 803-842, December.
    3. Daniela Del Boca, 2015. "The impact of child care costs and availability on mothers’ labor supply," ImPRovE Working Papers 15/04, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    4. Battistin, Erich & De Nadai, Michele & Padula, Mario, 2014. "Roadblocks on the Road to Grandma's House: Fertility Consequences of Delayed Retirement," CEPR Discussion Papers 9945, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. repec:wbk:wbpubs:12550 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. World Bank, 2013. "Opening Doors : Gender Equality and Development in the Middle East and North Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 12552, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    unpaid work; child care arrangements; labor supply;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • C1 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General
    • C3 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables

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