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Paying More to Hire the Best? Foreign Firms, Wages and Worker Mobility

  • Martins, Pedro S.


    (Queen Mary, University of London)

In the context of the debate on the labour-market consequences of globalisation, we examine worker mobility in order to identify the wage differences between foreign and domestic firms. Using matched employer-employee panel data for Portugal, we consider virtually all spells of interfirm mobility over a period of ten years. We find that foreign firms offer significantly more generous wage policies, although there is also a (smaller) selection effect. The results are robust to the consideration of wage growth differences, the case of displaced workers and different subsets of workers.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 3607.

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Length: 33 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2008
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Economic Inquiry, 2011, 49 (2), 349–363
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3607
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  1. Beata K. Smarzynska, 2003. "Does Foreign Direct Investment Increase the Productivity of Domestic Firms? In Search of Spillovers through Backward Linkages," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 548, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  2. Melissa Bjelland & Bruce Fallick & John Haltiwanger & Erika McEntarfer, 2010. "Employer-to-Employer Flows in the United States: Estimates Using Linked Employer-Employee Data," Working Papers 10-26, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  3. Pedro S. Martins & Luiz A. Esteves, 2008. "Foreign Ownership, Employment and Wages in Brazil: Evidence from Acquisitions, Divestments and Job Movers," Working Papers 15, Queen Mary, University of London, School of Business and Management, Centre for Globalisation Research.
  4. Louis S. Jacobson & Robert J. LaLonde & Daniel G. Sullivan, 1992. "Earnings losses of displaced workers," Working Paper Series, Macroeconomic Issues 92-28, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  5. Andrews, Martyn J. & Bellmann, Lutz & Schank, Thorsten & Upward, Richard, 2007. "The Takeover and Selection Effects of Foreign Ownership in Germany : An Analysis Using Linked Worker-Firm Data," Discussion Papers 50, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Chair of Labour and Regional Economics.
  6. Martins, Pedro S., 2007. "Heterogeneity in Real Wage Cyclicality," IZA Discussion Papers 2929, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Heyman, Fredrik & Sjöholm, Fredrik & Gustavsson Tingvall, Patrik, 2004. "Is there Really a Foreign Ownership Wage Premium? Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data," Working Paper Series 199, Trade Union Institute for Economic Research.
  8. John M. Abowd & Francis Kramarz & David Margolis, 1999. "High Wage Workers and High Wage Firms," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00353892, HAL.
  9. Robert C. Feenstra & Gordon H. Hanson, 1995. "Foreign Direct Investment and Relative Wages: Evidence from Mexico's Maquiladoras," NBER Working Papers 5122, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Martins, Pedro S., 2004. "Do Foreign Firms Really Pay Higher Wages? Evidence from Different Estimators," IZA Discussion Papers 1388, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Aitken, B. & Harrison, A. & Lipsey, R.E., 1995. "Wages and Foreign Ownership: A Comparative Study of Mexico, Venezuela, and the United States," Papers 95-21, Columbia - Graduate School of Business.
  12. Steven J. Davis & John C. Haltiwanger & Scott Schuh, 1998. "Job Creation and Destruction," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262540932, June.
  13. Mark Doms & Eric J. Bartelsman, 2000. "Understanding Productivity: Lessons from Longitudinal Microdata," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(3), pages 569-594, September.
  14. Fosfuri, Andrea & Motta, Massimo & Rønde, Thomas, 1999. "Foreign Direct Investment and Spillovers through Workers' Mobility," CEPR Discussion Papers 2194, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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