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The impact of sex-selective abortion technology on the evolution of postnatal gender-bias conventions

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  • Rebeca A. Echávarri

    () (Universidad Pública de Navarra)

Abstract

A substantial body of research presents the absence of control on the family sex-composition as one of the main reasons for raising neglected young girls in context of rooted son preference. Therefore, one expects that egalitarian intra-family distributions of survival resources are more welcomed with the control of family sex-composition. In this paper, we model the (possible) relationship between the expansion in the use of the sex-selective abortion technology and the intra-family allocation of survival resources. The model allows us to find features of the environment that might prevent the expected trade-off between the acceptation of both behavioural traits: the control of the family sex-composition and the unequal allocation of survival resources.

Suggested Citation

  • Rebeca A. Echávarri, 2007. "The impact of sex-selective abortion technology on the evolution of postnatal gender-bias conventions," Working Papers 78, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  • Handle: RePEc:inq:inqwps:ecineq2007-78
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    File URL: http://www.ecineq.org/milano/WP/ECINEQ2007-78.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ono, Hiroshi, 2004. "Are sons and daughters substitutable?: Allocation of family resources in contemporary Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 143-160, June.
    2. Young, H Peyton, 1993. "The Evolution of Conventions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(1), pages 57-84, January.
    3. Tim Dyson, 2001. "The Preliminary Demography of the 2001 Census of India," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 27(2), pages 341-356.
    4. Kandori, Michihiro & Mailath, George J & Rob, Rafael, 1993. "Learning, Mutation, and Long Run Equilibria in Games," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(1), pages 29-56, January.
    5. Bisin, Alberto & Verdier, Thierry, 2001. "The Economics of Cultural Transmission and the Dynamics of Preferences," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 298-319, April.
    6. Samuel Bowles, 1998. "Endogenous Preferences: The Cultural Consequences of Markets and Other Economic Institutions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 75-111, March.
    7. Stephan Klasen & Claudia Wink, 2003. ""Missing Women": Revisiting The Debate," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2-3), pages 263-299.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Evolution of conventions; cultural transmission; conformism; gender inequality.;

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics

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