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Fear of Crime: Does Trust and Community Participation Matter?

Author

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  • Pavel Luengas

    () (Office of Evaluation and Oversight at the Interamerican Development Bank.)

  • Inder J. Ruprah

    () (Office of Evaluation and Oversight at the Interamerican Development Bank.)

Abstract

This paper examines the association between trust and community involvement with fear of crime. Fear of crime is measured by three typical perception measures: neighborhood security; walking alone in the dark; and the risk of becoming a victim. The data is from Chile’s Victimization Survey. The techniques used are a multinomial regression and an impact –propensity score single difference- calculation. We find that while trust matters participation generally does not for fear. However, regressions leave open the direction of causality. An impact calculation confirms that participation in a neighborhood crime prevention program does not affect the fear of crime. Thus the evidence challenges the general idea that involvement in one’s community and the specific idea of community participation in neighborhood crime prevention programs reduce fear and increase feelings of safety.

Suggested Citation

  • Pavel Luengas & Inder J. Ruprah, 2008. "Fear of Crime: Does Trust and Community Participation Matter?," OVE Working Papers 0808, Inter-American Development Bank, Office of Evaluation and Oversight (OVE).
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:ovewps:0808
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Marco Caliendo & Sabine Kopeinig, 2008. "Some Practical Guidance For The Implementation Of Propensity Score Matching," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(1), pages 31-72, February.
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    Keywords

    Fear of crime; perceived safety; trust; community participation; multinomial logit regression; impact evaluation;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • K14 - Law and Economics - - Basic Areas of Law - - - Criminal Law
    • H43 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Project Evaluation; Social Discount Rate

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