IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/iae/iaewps/wp2005n13.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Effects of Smoking Ban Regulations on Individual Smoking Rates

Author

Listed:
  • Roger Wilkins

    () (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

  • David Black

    () (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

  • Hielke Buddelmeyer

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

Abstract

This paper describes the dynamics of smoking behaviour in Australia and investigates what impact smoking ban regulations have, if any, on individual smoking patterns. Such legislation receives a lot of press attention when announced and introduced, but its effect on individuals’ smoking behaviour has received little research attention. The main argument used to motivate the introduction of tougher smoking bans is reducing exposure of non-smokers to second hand smoke. From a public policy perspective it is important to know if these policies also affect whether people smoke, or if they only influence when and where people smoke. The Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey data allow us to track individuals’ smoking behaviour over the period 2001 to 2003, during which time smoking ban initiatives in Queensland, Victoria and the Northern Territory came into effect. We exploit this variation over time and across states to assess the impact of tougher smoking regulations. Our findings indicate that smoking is strongly correlated with education, gender, early life experiences, alcohol consumption, income, and other characteristics. Conditional on being a smoker in the previous period, we find that the single biggest predictor of quitting is pregnancy. Few other characteristics are able to explain who quits. Conditional on not smoking in the previous period, people who drink daily or weekly and couples who separated or divorced between the previous and current periods are most likely to take up smoking. The effect of the introduction of smoking ban regulations on individuals’ smoking behaviour is generally in the expected direction, albeit not statistically significant for most types of individual. However, we find a significant ‘rebellion’ effect among 18 to 24 year old smokers, with the introduction of smoking bans found to increase the likelihood that they continue to smoke.

Suggested Citation

  • Roger Wilkins & David Black & Hielke Buddelmeyer, 2005. "The Effects of Smoking Ban Regulations on Individual Smoking Rates," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2005n13, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  • Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2005n13
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/downloads/working_paper_series/wp2005n13.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1999:89:7:1018-1023_8 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Bardsley, Peter & Olekalns, Nilss, 1999. "Cigarette and Tobacco Consumption: Have Anti-smoking Policies Made a Difference?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 75(230), pages 225-240, September.
    3. Lorenzo Cappellari & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2004. "Modelling low income transitions," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., pages 593-610.
    4. Michael P. Kidd & Sandra Hopkins, 2004. "The Hazards of Starting and Quitting Smoking: Some Australian Evidence," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 80(249), pages 177-192, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Abel Brodeur, 2012. "Smoking, Income and Subjective Well-Being: Evidence from Smoking Bans," PSE Working Papers halshs-00664269, HAL.
    2. Poutvaara, Panu & Siemers, Lars-H. R., 2008. "Smoking and social interaction," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, pages 1503-1515.
    3. Jenny Williams & Christopher Skeels, 2006. "The Impact of Cannabis Use on Health," De Economist, Springer, pages 517-546.
    4. Silvia Tiezzi, 2009. "The Economic Impact of Clean Indoor Air Laws: A Review of Alternative Approaches and of Empirical findings," Department of Economics University of Siena 570, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    5. Shantanu Bagchi & James Feigenbaum, 2014. "Is Smoking a Fiscal Good?," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 17(1), pages 170-190, January.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2005n13. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Abbey Treloar). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/mimelau.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.