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The past, present and future of central banking

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  • David Cobham

Abstract

The financial crisis, on the one hand, and the recourse to ‘unconventional’ monetary policy, on the other, have given a sharp jolt to perceptions of the role and status of central banks. In this paper we start with a brief ‘contrarian’ history of central banks since the second world war, which presents the Great Moderation and the restricted focus on inflation targeting as a temporary aberration from the norm. We then discuss how recent developments in fiscal and monetary policy have affected the role and status of central banks, notably their relationships with governments, before considering the environment central banks will face in the near and middle future and how they will have to change to address it.

Suggested Citation

  • David Cobham, 2012. "The past, present and future of central banking," Heriot-Watt University Economics Discussion Papers 1205, Department of Economics, School of Management and Languages, Heriot Watt University.
  • Handle: RePEc:hwe:hwuedp:1205
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Claudio Borio, 2011. "Central banking post-crisis: What compass for uncharted waters?," BIS Working Papers 353, Bank for International Settlements.
    2. repec:sae:niesru:v:163:y::i:1:p:87-98 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Willem H. Buiter, 2013. "The Role of Central Banks in Financial Stability: How Has It Changed?," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: The Role of Central Banks in Financial Stability How Has It Changed?, chapter 2, pages 11-56 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    4. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2014. "This Time is Different: A Panoramic View of Eight Centuries of Financial Crises," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 15(2), pages 1065-1188, November.
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    12. Sushil Wadhwani, 2008. "Should Monetary Policy respond to Asset Price Bubbles? Revisiting the Debate," Chapters in SUERF Studies, SUERF - The European Money and Finance Forum.
    13. Garratt, Anthony & Koop, Gary & Mise, Emi & Vahey, Shaun P., 2009. "Real-Time Prediction With U.K. Monetary Aggregates in the Presence of Model Uncertainty," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 27(4), pages 480-491.
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    Cited by:

    1. Josh Ryan-Collins, 2015. "Is Monetary Financing Inflationary? A Case Study of the Canadian Economy, 1935-75," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_848, Levy Economics Institute.
    2. Christopher Bowdler & Amar Radia, 2012. "Unconventional monetary policy: the assessment," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 28(4), pages 603-621, WINTER.
    3. Cobham, David, 2015. "Multiple Objectives in Monetary Policy: A de Facto Analysis for ‘Advanced’ Countries," 2007 Annual Meeting, July 29-August 1, 2007, Portland, Oregon TN 2015-63, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    4. repec:wsi:serxxx:v:62:y:2017:i:01:n:s0217590817400033 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. David Cobham, 2015. "Multiple Objectives in Monetary Policy: A De Facto Analysis for ‘Advanced’ Countries," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 83, pages 83-106, September.
    6. Michal Jurek & Pawel Marszalek, 2015. "Policy alternatives for the relationship between ECB monetary and financial policies and new member states," Working papers wpaper112, Financialisation, Economy, Society & Sustainable Development (FESSUD) Project.
    7. Sheila Dow & Guðrún Johnsen & Alberto Montagnoli, 2015. "A critique of full reserve banking," Working Papers 2015008, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.

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