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Increasing Health Insurance Costs and the Decline in Health Insurance Coverage

Author

Listed:
  • Chernew, Michael
  • Cutler, David
  • Keenan, Patricia S.

Abstract

Objective. To determine the impact of rising health insurance premiums on coverage rates. Data Sources & Study Setting. Our analysis is based on two cohorts of nonelderly Americans residing in 64 large metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) surveyed in the Current Population Survey in 1989–1991 and 1998–2000. Measures of premiums are based on data from the Health Insurance Association of America and the Kaiser Family Foundation/Health Research and Educational Trust Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits. Study Design. Probit regression and instrumental variable techniques are used to estimate the association between rising local health insurance costs and the falling propensity for individuals to have any health insurance coverage, controlling for a rich array of economic, demographic, and policy covariates. Principal Findings. More than half of the decline in coverage rates experienced over the 1990s is attributable to the increase in health insurance premiums (2.0 percentage points of the 3.1 percentage point decline). Medicaid expansions led to a 1 percentage point increase in coverage. Changes in economic and demographic factors had little net effect. The number of people uninsured could increase by 1.9–6.3 million in the decade ending 2010 if real, per capita medical costs increase at a rate of 1–3 percentage points, holding all else constant. Conclusions. Initiatives aimed at reducing the number of uninsured must confront the growing pressure on coverage rates generated by rising costs.

Suggested Citation

  • Chernew, Michael & Cutler, David & Keenan, Patricia S., 2005. "Increasing Health Insurance Costs and the Decline in Health Insurance Coverage," Scholarly Articles 2660660, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hrv:faseco:2660660
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sherry Glied & Kathrine Jack, 2003. "Macroeconomic Conditions, Health Care Costs, and the Distribution of Health Insurance," NBER Working Papers 10029, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Farber, Henry S. & Levy, Helen, 2000. "Recent trends in employer-sponsored health insurance coverage: are bad jobs getting worse?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 93-119, January.
    3. Janet Currie & Aaron S. Yelowitz, 1999. "Health Insurance and Less Skilled Workers," JCPR Working Papers 63, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    4. Nyman, John A., 1999. "The value of health insurance: the access motive," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 141-152, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David M. Cutler, 2011. "Where are the Health Care Entrepreneurs? The Failure of Organizational Innovation in Health Care," NBER Chapters,in: Innovation Policy and the Economy, Volume 11, pages 1-28 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Duggan, Mark & Starc, Amanda & Vabson, Boris, 2016. "Who benefits when the government pays more? Pass-through in the Medicare Advantage program," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 50-67.
    3. van der Star, Sanne M. & van den Berg, Bernard, 2011. "Individual responsibility and health-risk behaviour: A contingent valuation study from the ex ante societal perspective," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 101(3), pages 300-311, August.
    4. Jeffrey Clemens, 2015. "Regulatory Redistribution in the Market for Health Insurance," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 109-134, April.
    5. Cutler, David M., 2010. "Where Are the Health Care Entrepreneurs? The Failure of Organizational Innovation in Health Care," Scholarly Articles 5345877, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    6. Fairlie, Robert W. & Kapur, Kanika & Gates, Susan, 2011. "Is employer-based health insurance a barrier to entrepreneurship?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 146-162, January.
    7. repec:spr:ijphth:v:62:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s00038-016-0911-z is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Robert Town & Douglas Wholey & Roger Feldman & Lawton R. Burns, 2006. "The Welfare Consequences of Hospital Mergers," NBER Working Papers 12244, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Michael Chernew & David Cutler & Patricia Seliger Keenan, 2005. "Charity Care, Risk Pooling, and the Decline in Private Health Insurance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 209-213, May.
    10. G. Edward Miller & Thomas M. Selden & Jessica S. Banthin, 2014. "Employer-Sim Microsimulation Model: Model Development and Application to Estimation of Tax Subsidies to Health Insurance," Working Papers 14-46, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.

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