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National Monetary Policy, Internatinal Economic Instability and Feeback Effects - An Overinvestment View

  • Andreas Hoffmann
  • Gunther Schnabl

    ()

    (Institute for Economic Policy, University of Leipzig)

The paper explains internationally transmitted boom-and-bust cycles as the outcome of excessive liquidity supply based on the credit boom theories of Hayek (1929; 937), Mises (1912) and Minsky (1986). We show how too expansionary monetary policies cause distortions in the economic structure and boom-and-bust cycles on both a national and an international level. Feedback effects of crises in periphery countries on center countries are shown to trigger a new round of monetary expansion in large countries, which provide international currencies to an asymmetric world monetary system. Crisis and contagion in globalized goods and financial markets indicate the limits of purely national monetary policies, which solely focus on domestic consumer prices and output. This makes the case for monetary policies in large countries, which take responsibility for the long-term effects of monetary policy on goods and financial markets in both home and foreign as put forward by Hayek (1937).

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File URL: http://pubdb.wiwi.uni-jena.de/pdf/wp_hlj19-2011.pdf
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Paper provided by Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena in its series Global Financial Markets Working Paper Series with number 19-2011.

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Date of creation: 24 Aug 2011
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Handle: RePEc:hlj:hljwrp:19-2011
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.gfinm.de

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  1. Gunther Schnabl & Andreas Hoffmann, 2008. "Monetary Policy, Vagabonding Liquidity and Bursting Bubbles in New and Emerging Markets: An Overinvestment View," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(9), pages 1226-1252, 09.
  2. Schnabl, Gunther & Freitag, Stephan, 2010. "Reverse causality in global current accounts," Working Paper Series 1208, European Central Bank.
  3. Hoffmann, Andreas, 2009. "An Overinvestment Cycle in Central and Eastern Europe?," MPRA Paper 15668, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Hoffmann, Andreas & Schnabl, Gunther, 2009. "A Vicious Cycle of Manias, Crashes and Asymmetric Policy Responses - An Overinvestment View," MPRA Paper 18532, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Ronald McKinnon & Gunther Schnabl, 2003. "The East Asian Dollar Standard, Fear of Floating, and Original Sin," Working Papers 112003, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
  6. Corsetti, Giancarlo & Pesenti, Paolo & Roubini, Nouriel, 1999. "Paper tigers?: A model of the Asian crisis," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(7), pages 1211-1236, June.
  7. Barry Eichengreen & Kris Mitchener, 2003. "The Great Depression as a credit boom gone wrong," BIS Working Papers 137, Bank for International Settlements.
  8. Ronald McKinnon, 2010. "Rehabilitating the unloved dollar standard," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 24(2), pages 1-18, November.
  9. Roger W. Garrison, 2004. "Overconsumption and Forced Saving in the Mises-Hayek Theory of the Business Cycle," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 36(2), pages 323-349, Summer.
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