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Does Foreign Bank Entry Affect Monetary Policy Effectiveness?: Exploring the Interest Rate Pass-Through Channel

Author

Listed:
  • Sasidaran Gopalan

    () (Institute for Emerging Market Studies, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology)

  • Ramikishen S. Rajan

    () (School of Policy, Government and International Affairs (SPGIA), George Mason University)

Abstract

This paper explores the impact of foreign bank entry on interest-rate-pass-through for a panel of 57 emerging and developing economies over 1995-2009. The paper tests for possible thresholds in terms of foreign bank presence that differentially impact interest-rate passthrough. The empirical results suggest that there are strong threshold effects in that foreign bank entry tends to enhance interest rate pass-through only in countries with greater degree of foreign bank presence compared to those with limited entry. The paper also finds that when foreign bank entry leads to greater banking concentration, it significantly lowers the extent of interest rate transmission.

Suggested Citation

  • Sasidaran Gopalan & Ramikishen S. Rajan, 2015. "Does Foreign Bank Entry Affect Monetary Policy Effectiveness?: Exploring the Interest Rate Pass-Through Channel," HKUST IEMS Working Paper Series 2015-06, HKUST Institute for Emerging Market Studies, revised Feb 2015.
  • Handle: RePEc:hku:wpaper:201506
    as

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    File URL: http://iems.ust.hk/assets/publications/working-papers-2015/iemswp2015-06_rev.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mishra, Prachi & Montiel, Peter, 2013. "How effective is monetary transmission in low-income countries? A survey of the empirical evidence," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 187-216.
    2. Angeliki Kourelis & Carlo Cottarelli, 1994. "Financial Structure, Bank Lending Rates, and the Transmission Mechanism of Monetary Policy," IMF Working Papers 94/39, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Saumitra N. Bhaduri & Toto Goyal, 2015. "The bank lending channel of monetary policy transmission: evidence from an emerging market, India," International Journal of Banking, Accounting and Finance, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 6(1), pages 1-20.
    4. Marco Arena & Carmen Reinhart & Francisco Vázquez, 2006. "The Lending Channel in Emerging Economics: Are Foreign Banks Different?," NBER Working Papers 12340, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Stijn Claessens & Neeltje Horen, 2014. "Foreign Banks: Trends and Impact," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 46(s1), pages 295-326, February.
    6. Ben S. Bernanke & Mark Gertler, 1995. "Inside the Black Box: The Credit Channel of Monetary Policy Transmission," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 27-48, Fall.
    7. Wu, Ji & Luca, Alina C. & Jeon, Bang Nam, 2011. "Foreign bank penetration and the lending channel in emerging economies: Evidence from bank-level panel data," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1128-1156, October.
    8. Jeon, Bang Nam & Wu, Ji, 2014. "The role of foreign banks in monetary policy transmission: Evidence from Asia during the crisis of 2008–9," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 96-120.
    9. Sami Alpanda & Uluc Aysun, 2012. "Global Banking and the Balance Sheet Channel of Monetary Transmission," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 8(3), pages 141-175, September.
    10. Murillo Campello, 2002. "Internal Capital Markets in Financial Conglomerates: Evidence from Small Bank Responses to Monetary Policy," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(6), pages 2773-2805, December.
    11. Nicola Cetorelli & Linda S Goldberg, 2011. "Global Banks and International Shock Transmission: Evidence from the Crisis," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 59(1), pages 41-76, April.
    12. Carlo Cottarelli & Angeliki Kourelis, 1994. "Financial Structure, Bank Lending Rates, and the Transmission Mechanism of Monetary Policy," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 41(4), pages 587-623, December.
    13. repec:onb:oenbwp:y:2006:i:1:b:1 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Sukudhew Singh & Ahmad Razi & Norhana Endut & Helmi Ramlee, 2008. "Impact of financial market developments on the monetary transmission mechanism," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Financial market developments and their implications for monetary policy, volume 39, pages 49-99 Bank for International Settlements.
    15. Mojon, Benoît, 2000. "Financial structure and the interest rate channel of ECB monetary policy," Working Paper Series 0040, European Central Bank.
    16. Anamaria Illes & Marco Jacopo Lombardi, 2013. "Interest rate pass-through since the financial crisis," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, September.
    17. Fabrizio Coricelli & Balázs Égert & Ronald MacDonald, 2006. "Monetary Transmission in Central and Eastern Europe: Gliding on a Wind of Change," Focus on European Economic Integration, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 1, pages 44-87.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Perera, Anil & Wickramanayake, J., 2016. "Determinants of commercial bank retail interest rate adjustments: Evidence from a panel data model," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 1-20.
    2. repec:wsi:jicepx:v:06:y:2015:i:02:n:s1793993315500076 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Sasidaran Gopalan, 2015. "Foreign Banks in Emerging Markets: Advantage or Impediment?," HKUST IEMS Thought Leadership Brief Series 2015-04, HKUST Institute for Emerging Market Studies, revised Jan 2015.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    foreign bank entry; financial liberalization; financial inclusion; financial development; banking concentration; interest rates;

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • G00 - Financial Economics - - General - - - General
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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