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Social Accounting and the Public Sector

  • Aronsson, Thomas

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Umeå University)

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    This paper contributes to the theory of social accounting. As such, it tries to extend earlier literature on the welfare equivalence of the comprehensive net national product in two main directions, both of which refer to the public sector. One is by considering welfare measurement problems associated with redistributive policy and public good provision, when the public revenues are raised by distortionary taxes. The other is by addressing the consequences of a 'federation-like' decision structure, where independent tax and expenditure decisions are made both by the central government and by lower level governments. In particular, the analysis shows how so called vertical fiscal external effects, which are associated with tax base sharing among the central and lower level governments, contribute to social accounting.

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    File URL: http://www.econ.umu.se/DownloadAsset.action?contentId=53392&languageId=3&assetKey=ues644
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    Paper provided by Umeå University, Department of Economics in its series Umeå Economic Studies with number 644.

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    Length: 36 pages
    Date of creation: 13 Dec 2004
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:hhs:umnees:0644
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, Umeå University, S-901 87 Umeå, Sweden
    Phone: 090 - 786 61 42
    Fax: 090 - 77 23 02
    Web page: http://www.econ.umu.se/
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    1. M. L. Weitzman, 1974. "On the Welfare Significance of National Product in Dynamic Economy," Working papers 125, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    2. Robin Boadway & Michael Keen, 1996. "Efficiency and the optimal direction of federal-state transfers," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 3(2), pages 137-155, May.
    3. Deaton, Angus, 1986. "Demand analysis," Handbook of Econometrics, in: Z. Griliches† & M. D. Intriligator (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 30, pages 1767-1839 Elsevier.
    4. Boadway, Robin & Keen, Michael, 2000. "Redistribution," Handbook of Income Distribution, in: A.B. Atkinson & F. Bourguignon (ed.), Handbook of Income Distribution, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 12, pages 677-789 Elsevier.
    5. Michel, Philippe, 1982. "On the Transversality Condition in Infinite Horizon Optimal Problems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 975-85, July.
    6. Dahlberg, Matz & Lindström , Tomas, 1996. "Are Local Governments Governed by Forward Looking Decision Makers?," Working Paper Series 1996:20, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    7. Lancaster, Kelvin, 1973. "The Dynamic Inefficiency of Capitalism," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(5), pages 1092-1109, Sept.-Oct.
    8. Hansson, Ingemar & Stuart, Charles, 1987. "The suboptimality of local taxation under two-tier fiscal federalism," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 407-411.
    9. John M. Hartwick, 1990. "Natural Resources, National Accounting and Economic Depreciation," Working Papers 771, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    10. Holtz-Eakin Douglas & Rosen Harvey S. & Tilly Schuyler, 1994. "Intertemporal Analysis of State and Local Government Spending: Theory and Tests," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 159-174, March.
    11. Dahlby, Bev & Wilson, Leonard S., 2003. "Vertical fiscal externalities in a federation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(5-6), pages 917-930, May.
    12. Hoel, Michael, 1978. "Distribution and Growth as a Differential Game between Workers and Capitalists," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 19(2), pages 335-50, June.
    13. Michael J. Keen & Christos Kotsogiannis, 2002. "Does Federalism Lead to Excessively High Taxes?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 363-370, March.
    14. Aronsson, Thomas & Lofgren, Karl-Gustaf, 1999. "Pollution tax design and 'Green' national accounting," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(8), pages 1457-1474, August.
    15. Aronsson, Thomas & Lofgren, Karl-Gustaf, 1999. "Welfare equivalent NNP under distributional objectives," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 239-243, May.
    16. Johnson, William R, 1988. "Income Redistribution in a Federal System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(3), pages 570-73, June.
    17. Aronsson, Thomas & Lofgren, Karl-Gustaf, 1996. " Social Accounting and Welfare Measurement in a Growth Model with Human Capital," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 98(2), pages 185-201, June.
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