IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hhs/eijswp/0226.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Population Growth And Job Creation In Timor-Leste

Author

Listed:

Abstract

Timor-Leste began its independence as one of the poorest nations in the world. Substantial progress has been made thereafter but the challenges for future development are numerous. High population growth and modest growth of GDP means that per capita income is declining and that the extent of poverty is increasing. For this situation to change, income opportunities other than those provided by subsistence agriculture are needed. Considering the low level of education and the keen competition for skilled personnel this, however, is difficult. So far, it seems that most skilled workers are being absorbed by the public sector and that this is pushing up the already high skilled wage level. That, in turn, affects the competitiveness of the private sector negatively and acts as an obstacle to the creation of employment opportunities outside agriculture.

Suggested Citation

  • Lundahl, Mats & Sjöholm, Fredrik, 2006. "Population Growth And Job Creation In Timor-Leste," EIJS Working Paper Series 226, Stockholm School of Economics, The European Institute of Japanese Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:eijswp:0226
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://swopec.hhs.se/eijswp/papers/eijswp0226.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Angeles, Gustavo & Guilkey, David K & Mroz, Thomas A, 2005. "The Effects of Education and Family Planning Programs on Fertility in Indonesia," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 54(1), pages 165-201, October.
    2. Das, Maitreyi Bordia & O'Keefe, Philip, 2007. "Enterprises, workers, and skills in Urban Timor-Leste," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4177, The World Bank.
    3. Ronald Findlay & John D. Wilson, 1987. "The Political Economy of Leviathan," Palgrave Macmillan Books, in: Assaf Razin & Efraim Sadka (ed.), Economic Policy in Theory and Practice, chapter 8, pages 289-306, Palgrave Macmillan.
    4. Assaf Razin & Efraim Sadka (ed.), 1987. "Economic Policy in Theory and Practice," Palgrave Macmillan Books, Palgrave Macmillan, number 978-1-349-18584-9, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Lisa Chauvet & Paul Collier & Anke Hoeffler, 2010. "Paradise Lost: The Costs of State Failure in the Pacific," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(5), pages 961-980.
    2. Doraisami, Anita, 2018. "The Timor Leste Petroleum Fund, veterans and white elephants: Fostering intergenerational equity?," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 250-256.
    3. Mats Lundahl & Fredrik Sjöholm, 2013. "Improving the Lot of the Farmer: Development Challenges in Timor-Leste during the Second Decade of Independence," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, vol. 12(2), pages 71-96, Summer.
    4. Ben Moxham & Jovana Carapic, 2013. "Unravelling Dili: The Crisis of City and State in Timor-Leste," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 50(15), pages 3116-3133, November.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Richard H. Clarida & Ronald Findlay, 1991. "Endogenous Comparative Advantage, Government, and the Pattern of Trade," NBER Working Papers 3813, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Göbel, Jürgen, 2009. "In search of an appropriate tax base for local Leviathans," MPRA Paper 13940, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Wilson, John Douglas, 2005. "Welfare-improving competition for mobile capital," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 1-18, January.
    4. John Douglas Wilson & Roger H. Gordon, 2003. "Expenditure Competition," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 5(2), pages 399-417, April.
    5. Aristomène Varoudakis & Claude Jessua, 1996. "Régimes non démocratiques et croissance : théorie et estimation," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 47(3), pages 831-840.
    6. Kong Weng Ho & Hian Teck Hoon, 1998. "Productivity Growth and Public Sector Employment," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 42(2), pages 73-79, October.
    7. Ronald Findlay, 1995. "Infrastructure, Human Capital and International Trade," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 131(III), pages 289-301, September.
    8. Atanas Christev, 2006. "Learning Hyperinflations," Computing in Economics and Finance 2006 475, Society for Computational Economics.
    9. Caroline Krafft, 2020. "Why is fertility on the rise in Egypt? The role of women’s employment opportunities," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 33(4), pages 1173-1218, October.
    10. Bettendorf, Leon J.H. & Heijdra, Ben J., 1999. "Intergenerational and international welfare leakages of a tariff in a small open economy," CCSO Working Papers 199910, University of Groningen, CCSO Centre for Economic Research.
    11. Mitchell, Peter R. & Sault, Joanne E. & Wallis, Kenneth F., 2000. "Fiscal policy rules in macroeconomic models: principles and practice," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 171-193, April.
    12. repec:zbw:cfswop:wp200303 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Cukierman, Alex, 1986. "Uncertain Lifetimes and the Ricardian Equivalence Proposition," Foerder Institute for Economic Research Working Papers 275423, Tel-Aviv University > Foerder Institute for Economic Research.
    14. Christiano, Lawrence J. & G. Harrison, Sharon, 1999. "Chaos, sunspots and automatic stabilizers," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 3-31, August.
    15. repec:zbw:cfswop:wp200415 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Klaus Adam, 2003. "Learning and Equilibrium Selection in a Monetary Overlapping Generations Model with Sticky Prices," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 70(4), pages 887-907.
    17. Luca Benati, 2018. "Cagan’s Paradox Revisited," Diskussionsschriften dp1826, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft.
    18. Peter Bernholz & Peter Kugler, 2009. "The Success of Currency Reforms to End Great Inflations: An Empirical Analysis of 34 High Inflations," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 10(2), pages 165-175, May.
    19. Arce, Oscar J., 2009. "Speculative hyperinflations and currency substitution," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1808-1823, October.
    20. Buiter, Willem H. & Sibert, Anne C., 2016. "Government deficits in large open economies: The problem of too little public debt," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal (2007-2020), Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel), vol. 10, pages 1-39.
    21. Van Zandt, Timothy & Lettau, Martin, 2003. "Robustness Of Adaptive Expectations As An Equilibrium Selection Device," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(1), pages 89-118, February.
    22. Francesca Marchetta & David E. Sahn, 2016. "The Role of Education and Family Background in Marriage, Childbearing, and Labor Market Participation in Senegal," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64(2), pages 369-403.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Timor-Leste; Job Creation; Development; Industry;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hhs:eijswp:0226. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/eihhsse.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Nanhee Lee (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/eihhsse.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.