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Regime-Switching Stock Returns And Mean Reversion

Author

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  • Nielsen, Steen

    (Department of Economics, Copenhagen Business School)

  • Olesen, Jan Overgaard

    (Department of Economics, Copenhagen Business School)

Abstract

We estimate a well-specified two-state regime-switching model for Danish stock returns. The model identifies two regimes which have low return-low volatility and high return-high volatility, respectively. The low return-low volatility regime dominated, except in a few, short episodes, until the beginning of the 70s whereas the 80s and 90s have been characterized by high return and high volatility. We propose an alternative test of mean reversion which allows for multiple regimes with potentially different constant and autoregressive terms and different volatility. Using this test procedure we find mean reversion at 10% but not at 5% significance level which is weaker evidence than produced by estimating a standard autoregressive model for returns. Furthermore, when analyzing contributions of the two regimes we find that the indication of mean reversion is due to the recent high return-high volatility regime only.

Suggested Citation

  • Nielsen, Steen & Olesen, Jan Overgaard, 2001. "Regime-Switching Stock Returns And Mean Reversion," Working Papers 11-2000, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:cbsnow:2000_011
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    File URL: http://openarchive.cbs.dk/cbsweb/handle/10398/7529
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Myung Jig Kim & Charles R. Nelson & Richard Startz, 1991. "Mean Reversion in Stock Prices? A Reappraisal of the Empirical Evidence," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(3), pages 515-528.
    2. Fama, Eugene F & French, Kenneth R, 1988. "Permanent and Temporary Components of Stock Prices," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(2), pages 246-273, April.
    3. Kim, Chang-Jin & Nelson, Charles R. & Startz, Richard, 1998. "Testing for mean reversion in heteroskedastic data based on Gibbs-sampling-augmented randomization1," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 5(2), pages 131-154, June.
    4. Hamilton, James D., 1996. "Specification testing in Markov-switching time-series models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 127-157, January.
    5. Hamilton, James D., 1990. "Analysis of time series subject to changes in regime," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1-2), pages 39-70.
    6. Poterba, James M. & Summers, Lawrence H., 1988. "Mean reversion in stock prices : Evidence and Implications," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 27-59, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Vassilios Babalos & Mehmet Balcilar & Rangan Gupta, 2014. "Revisiting Herding Behavior in REITs: A Regime-Switching Approach," Working Papers 201448, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    2. Mehmet Balcilar & Riza Demirer & Shawkat Hammoudeh & Ahmed Khalifa, 2013. "Do Global Shocks Drive Investor Herds in Oil-Rich Frontier Markets?," Working Papers 819, Economic Research Forum, revised Dec 2013.
    3. Balcilar, Mehmet & Demirer, Rıza & Hammoudeh, Shawkat, 2014. "What drives herding in oil-rich, developing stock markets? Relative roles of own volatility and global factors," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 418-440.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Regime-Switching; Stock returns; Mean reversion; Denmark;

    JEL classification:

    • G19 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Other

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