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Capital Constraints, Trade and Crowding Out of Southern Firms

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    Introducing capital market imperfections to a 'footloose capital'’model, I show how such distortions may explain the observed phenomena of an industrialized north and an underdeveloped south. Further, I show that with inter-generational savings internationalization will cause a crowding out of manufacturing firms in the south, increasing the share of the southern population that are credit-constrained, and also reducing total income in the country. This should not, however, be taken as an argument for protectionism, as welfare may indeed be higher with trade than in autarky, if trade costs are sufficiently low.

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    File URL: http://www.uib.no/filearchive/wp05.11.pdf
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    Paper provided by University of Bergen, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers in Economics with number 05/11.

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    Length: 57 pages
    Date of creation: 02 Feb 2011
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:hhs:bergec:2011_005
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Institutt for økonomi, Universitetet i Bergen, Postboks 7802, 5020 Bergen, Norway
    Phone: (+47)55589200
    Fax: (+47)55589210
    Web page: http://www.uib.no/econ/en
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    1. Ranjan, Priya, 2001. "Dynamic evolution of income distribution and credit-constrained human capital investment in open economies," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 329-358, December.
    2. Pol Antràs & Ricardo J. Caballero, 2009. "Trade and Capital Flows: A Financial Frictions Perspective," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 117(4), pages 701-744, 08.
    3. Chesnokova, Tatyana, 2007. "Immiserizing deindustrialization: A dynamic trade model with credit constraints," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(2), pages 407-420, November.
    4. Das, Satya P., 2006. "Trade, skill acquisition and distribution," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 118-141, October.
    5. Banerjee, Abhijit V & Newman, Andrew F, 1993. "Occupational Choice and the Process of Development," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(2), pages 274-98, April.
    6. Richard Baldwin & Toshihiro Okubo, 2005. "Heterogeneous Firms, Agglomeration and Economic Geography: Spatial Selection and Sorting," NBER Working Papers 11650, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Dupont, Vincent & Martin, Philippe, 2003. "Subsidies to Poor Regions and Inequalities: Some Unpleasant Arithmetic," CEPR Discussion Papers 4107, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Krugman, Paul R & Venables, Anthony J, 1995. "Globalization and the Inequality of Nations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 110(4), pages 857-80, November.
    9. Antonio Ciccone & Robert E. Hall, 1993. "Productivity and the Density of Economic Activity," NBER Working Papers 4313, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Martin, Philippe & Rogers, Carol Ann, 1995. "Industrial location and public infrastructure," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3-4), pages 335-351, November.
    11. Paul Krugman, 1990. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," NBER Working Papers 3275, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Diego Puga, 2009. "The magnitude and causes of agglomeration economies," Working Papers 2009-09, Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados (IMDEA) Ciencias Sociales.
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