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Knowledge combinations and the survival of financial services ventures

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  • Wennberg, Karl

    () (Dept. of Business Administration, Stockholm School of Economics)

Abstract

This paper investigates the role of knowledge in the evolution of new financial services ventures in Sweden between 1990 and 2002. Drawing upon economic theories of human capital and spin-out entrepreneurship, we investigate if knowledge from prior employment in the financial and technological industries facilitates the survival of new entrepreneurial firms. Based on a database tracking the evolution of 1,077 financial services ventures, we find that firms with more extensive knowledge from the financial services and high-tech sectors have higher chances of survival than firms with more narrow knowledge bases. Our findings offer contributions to the emerging literature on spin-out entrepreneurship and to research on entrepreneurship in services.

Suggested Citation

  • Wennberg, Karl, 2008. "Knowledge combinations and the survival of financial services ventures," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Business Administration 2008:1, Stockholm School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhb:hastba:2008_001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Iyigun, Murat F & Owen, Ann L, 1998. "Risk, Entrepreneurship, and Human-Capital Accumulation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 454-457, May.
    2. Davidsson, Per & Honig, Benson, 2003. "The role of social and human capital among nascent entrepreneurs," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 301-331, May.
    3. Agarwal, Rajshree & Echambadi, Raj & Franco, April M. & Sarkar, M. B., 2002. "Knowledge Transfer through Congenital Learning: Spin-Out Generation, Growth and Survival," Working Papers 02-0101, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, College of Business.
    4. Cooper, Arnold C. & Folta, Timothy B. & Woo, Carolyn, 1995. "Entrepreneurial information search," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 107-120, March.
    5. G. M. Peter Swann & Rui Baptista, 1999. "A comparison of clustering dynamics in the US and UK computer industries," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 373-399.
    6. Klepper, Steven, 2001. "Employee Startups in High-Tech Industries," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(3), pages 639-674, September.
    7. Michael Dahl & Toke Reichstein, 2007. "Are You Experienced? Prior Experience and the Survival of New Organizations," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(5), pages 497-511.
    8. Michael S. Dahl & Christian Ø.R. Pedersen & Bent Dalum, 2003. "Entry by Spinoff in a High-tech Cluster," DRUID Working Papers 03-11, DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies.
    9. Catherine Armington & Zoltan Acs, 2004. "Job creation and persistence in services and manufacturing," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 309-325, July.
    10. van der Aa, Wietze & Elfring, Tom, 2002. "Realizing innovation in services," Scandinavian Journal of Management, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 155-171, June.
    11. Audretsch, David B & Mahmood, Talat, 1994. "Firm Selection and Industry Evolution: The Post-entry Performance of New Firms," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 243-260, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Wennberg, K. & Tether, B. & Li, C. & Mina, A., 2010. "Turning Digital: Diversification in UK Design Consultancy Services," Working Papers wp413, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    2. Werner, Arndt & Moog, Petra, 2009. "Why do Employees Leave Their Jobs for Self-Employment? – The Impact of Entrepreneurial Working Conditions in Small Firms," MPRA Paper 18826, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. José Belso-Martínez & Xavier Molina-Morales & Francisco Más-Verdú, 2011. "How cluster membership places the mediatior effect of the internal resources on the association between KIBS and the growth of new innovative firms," ERSA conference papers ersa11p1732, European Regional Science Association.
    4. repec:eee:tefoso:v:122:y:2017:i:c:p:186-195 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Jonathan Borggren & Rikard H. Eriksson & Urban Lindgren, 2015. "Knowledge flows in high-impact firms: How does relatedness influence survival, acquisition and exit?," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1512, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised May 2015.
    6. M. Capasso & E. Cefis & K. Frenken, 2009. "Do some firms persistently outperform?," Working Papers 09-, Utrecht School of Economics.
    7. Agarwal, Rajshree & Shah, Sonali K., 2014. "Knowledge sources of entrepreneurship: Firm formation by academic, user and employee innovators," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(7), pages 1109-1133.
    8. Wennberg, Karl & Wiklund, Johan & Wright, Mike, 2011. "The effectiveness of university knowledge spillovers: Performance differences between university spinoffs and corporate spinoffs," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1128-1143, October.
    9. Kim, Phillip H. & Longest, Kyle C., 2014. "You can't leave your work behind: Employment experience and founding collaborations," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 785-806.
    10. McKelvie, Alexander & Brattström, Anna & Wennberg, Karl, 2013. "The Relationship Between Innovation and New Firm Growth," Ratio Working Papers 206, The Ratio Institute.
    11. Alex Coad & Sven-Olov Daunfeldt & Dan Johansson & Karl Wennberg, 2014. "Whom do high-growth firms hire?," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(1), pages 293-327, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Entrepreneurship; Spin-out; spin-off; Knowledge; Financial services; Survival analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship
    • M13 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - New Firms; Startups
    • L84 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Personal, Professional, and Business Services

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