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Does it pay to be a doctor in France?

Author

Listed:
  • Brigitte Dormont

    (LEDa - Laboratoire d'Economie de Dauphine - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - Université Paris-Dauphine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Anne-Laure Samson

    (LEDa - Laboratoire d'Economie de Dauphine - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - Université Paris-Dauphine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

This paper examines whether general practitionersí(GPsí) earnings are high enough to keep this profession attractive. We set up two samples, with longitudinaldata relative to GPs and executives. Those two professions have similar abilities but GPs have chosen a longer education. To measure if they get returns that compensate for their higher investment, we study their career proÖles and construct a measure of wealth for each individual that takes into account all earnings accumulated from the age of 24 (including zero income years when they start their career after 24). The stochastic dominance analysis shows that wealth distributions do not differ significantly between male GPs and executives but that GP wealth distribution dominates executive wealth distribution at the first order for women.Hence, while there is no monetary advantage or disadvantage to be a GP for men, it is more profitable for women to be a self-employed GP than a salaried executive.

Suggested Citation

  • Brigitte Dormont & Anne-Laure Samson, 2017. "Does it pay to be a doctor in France?," Working Papers hal-01518428, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-01518428
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01518428
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Verbeek, Marno & Nijman, Theo, 1992. "Testing for Selectivity Bias in Panel Data Models," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 33(3), pages 681-703, August.
    2. repec:dau:papers:123456789/1624 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. David M. Cutler & Dan P. Ly, 2011. "The (Paper)Work of Medicine: Understanding International Medical Costs," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 25(2), pages 3-25, Spring.
    4. B. Dormont & A.-L. Samson, 2008. "Medical demography and intergenerational inequalities in general practitioners' earnings," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(9), pages 1037-1055.
    5. Russell Davidson & Jean-Yves Duclos, 2000. "Statistical Inference for Stochastic Dominance and for the Measurement of Poverty and Inequality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(6), pages 1435-1464, November.
    6. Brigitte Dormont & Anne-Laure Samson, 2008. "Medical Demography and Intergenerational inequalities in GPs' earnings," Post-Print halshs-00351781, HAL.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    GPs; longitudinal data; earning profile; self-employed; executive; stochastic dominance;

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