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Addiction to car use and dynamic elasticity measures in France

  • Roger Collet

    (DEST - Département Economie et Sociologie des Transports - INRETS)

  • Mathieu De Lapparent

    (DEST - Département Economie et Sociologie des Transports - INRETS)

  • Laurent Hivert

    ()

    (DEST - Département Economie et Sociologie des Transports - INRETS)

This article presents a microeconometric analysis of the annual mileage travelled by French households with their personal cars, defining their automobility. To feature car use dependence, the rational addiction model of Becker et al. (1994) is applied on a panel dataset, drawn from the French "Car Fleet" survey over the period 1999-2001. Importantly, the estimates show that the assumption of addiction to car use cannot be rejected. Furthermore, the model yields realistic kilometric-price and income elasticities of household automobility, for both the short and the long runs.

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File URL: http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/61/49/66/PDF/2009_dest_collet_hivert_addiction_to_car_and_dynamic_elasticity_measures_in_france.pdf
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Paper provided by HAL in its series Post-Print with number hal-00614966.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Publication status: Published - Presented, 12th World Conference on Transport Research, 2010, Lisbonne, Portugal
Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-00614966
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00614966/en/
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  1. Bentzen, J. & Eriksson, T. & Smith, V., 1997. "Rational Addiction and Alcohol Consumption: Evidence from the Nordic Countries," Papers 97-16, Aarhus School of Business - Department of Economics.
  2. Badi H. Baltagi & James M. Griffin, 2002. "Rational addiction to alcohol: panel data analysis of liquor consumption," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(6), pages 485-491.
  3. Michael Grossman & Frank J. Chaloupka & Ismail Sirtalan, 1995. "An Empirical Analysis of Alcohol Addiction: Results from the Monitoring the Future Panels," NBER Working Papers 5200, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Sisto, Andrea & Zanola, Roberto, 2005. "Rationally Addicted to Cinema and Tv? An empirical investigation of Italian consumers," POLIS Working Papers 46, Institute of Public Policy and Public Choice - POLIS.
  5. Samuel Cameron, 1999. "Rational addiction and the demand for cinema," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(9), pages 617-620.
  6. Christopher F Baum & Mark E. Schaffer & Steven Stillman, 2003. "Instrumental variables and GMM: Estimation and testing," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 3(1), pages 1-31, March.
  7. Grossman, Michael & Chaloupka, Frank J., 1998. "The demand for cocaine by young adults: a rational addiction approach," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 427-474, August.
  8. Breusch, T S & Pagan, A R, 1979. "A Simple Test for Heteroscedasticity and Random Coefficient Variation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(5), pages 1287-94, September.
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