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D'un siècle à l'autre : salaire minimum, science économique et débat public aux Etats-Unis, en France et au Royaume-Uni (1890-2015)

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  • Jérôme Gautié

    () (CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

The recent revival of the minimum wage debates is an incentive to recall their long history, which started at the end of the XIXth century. Three levels of analysis are combined here. The first one is the study of both the empirical and theoretical contents of the economic controversies. The second one is the analysis of the methodological, and beyond, epistemological issues at stake. Eventually, the third one relies on an historical sociology of science, focusing on the relations and interactions of the academic field with three other fields: the political field, the administrative field, and the field of the actors from civil society and the economic and social world. The study focuses on three countries: the United-States, France and the United-Kingdom (and its Commonwealth). Three key periods are distinguished: around World War I, the period from the 1940s to the 1980s, and the present period starting in the mid-1990s. From the history of the minimum wage debates, one can also learn about the evolution of labour economics, and beyond, the history of economics as a scientific discipline.

Suggested Citation

  • Jérôme Gautié, 2015. "D'un siècle à l'autre : salaire minimum, science économique et débat public aux Etats-Unis, en France et au Royaume-Uni (1890-2015)," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01244339, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:cesptp:halshs-01244339
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01244339
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    Keywords

    Minimum wage; history of economic thought; rhetoric of economics; rhétorique économique; salaire minimum; histoire de la pensée économique;
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