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The Important Thing is not to Win, it is to Take Part: What If Scientists Benefit from Participating in Competitive Grant Races?

Author

Listed:
  • Charles Ayoubi

    (Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne)

  • Michele Pezzoni

    (Université Côte d’Azur, CNRS, GREDEG, France)

  • Fabiana Visentin

    (Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne)

Abstract

The famous saying by Pierre de Coubertin asserts that the value athletes draw from Olympic competitions lies in their participation and not in the gold they collect. We find similar evidence for scientists taking part in grant races. Relying on unique data from a Swiss funding program, we find that a scientist participating in a grant application process boosts her number of publications, average impact factor, learning, and collaboration network regardless of the results of the competition. Receiving the funds increases the probability of co-authoring with co-applicants but has no additional impact on the individual productivity.

Suggested Citation

  • Charles Ayoubi & Michele Pezzoni & Fabiana Visentin, 2017. "The Important Thing is not to Win, it is to Take Part: What If Scientists Benefit from Participating in Competitive Grant Races?," GREDEG Working Papers 2017-27, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
  • Handle: RePEc:gre:wpaper:2017-27
    as

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    File URL: http://www.gredeg.cnrs.fr/working-papers/GREDEG-WP-2017-27.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2017
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pierre Azoulay & Toby Stuart & Yanbo Wang, 2014. "Matthew: Effect or Fable?," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 60(1), pages 92-109, January.
    2. Defazio, Daniela & Lockett, Andy & Wright, Mike, 2009. "Funding incentives, collaborative dynamics and scientific productivity: Evidence from the EU framework program," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 293-305, March.
    3. Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2009. "Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 8769.
    4. Paula E. Stephan, 2010. "The Economics of Science - Funding for Research," ICER Working Papers 12-2010, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research.
    5. Ayoubi, Charles & Pezzoni, Michele & Visentin, Fabiana, 2017. "At the origins of learning: Absorbing knowledge flows from within the team," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 374-387.
    6. Jacob, Brian A. & Lefgren, Lars, 2011. "The impact of research grant funding on scientific productivity," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(9-10), pages 1168-1177, October.
    7. Adam B. Jaffe, 2002. "Building Programme Evaluation into the Design of Public Research-Support Programmes," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(1), pages 22-34, Spring.
    8. Charles Ayoubi & Michele Pezzoni & Fabiana Visentin, 2016. "At the Origins of Learning: Absorbing Knowledge Flows from Within or Outside the Team?," GREDEG Working Papers 2016-08, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
    9. Nicolas CARAYOL & Marianne LANOË, 2017. "The Impact of Project-Based Funding in Science: \r\nLessons from the ANR Experience," Cahiers du GREThA 2017-04, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    10. Jacob, Brian A. & Lefgren, Lars, 2011. "The impact of research grant funding on scientific productivity," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(9), pages 1168-1177.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    competitive grants; public funding evaluation; scientific productivity; scientific collaboration; learning;

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