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The Impact of NSF Support for Basic Research in Economics

In: Contributions in Memory of Zvi Griliches

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  • Ashish Arora
  • Alfonso Gambardella

Abstract

This paper studies the relationship between NSF funding and the publications of US economists using data on 1473 applications to NSF during 1985-1990, 414 of which were awarded a research grant. We first outline a basic methodology for assessing the impact of the NSF support for basic research in Economics. In doing so, we shall also point to key conceptual and measurement problems. Second, we provide empirical evidence about the factors that influence the NSF allocation decision, the effects of this decision on the production of publications, and the extent to which these effects differ among researchers at different stages of their career.
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Suggested Citation

  • Ashish Arora & Alfonso Gambardella, 2010. "The Impact of NSF Support for Basic Research in Economics," NBER Chapters, in: Contributions in Memory of Zvi Griliches, pages 91-115, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:12229
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    as
    1. James Adams & Zvi Griliches, 1996. "Measuring Science: An Exploration," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1749, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    2. Ashish Arora & Alfonso Gambardella, 1996. "Reputation and competence in publicly funded scientific research," Industrial Organization 9605002, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yin, Zhifeng & Liang, Zheng & Zhi, Qiang, 2018. "Does the concentration of scientific research funding in institutions promote knowledge output?," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 1146-1159.
    2. Wang, Jian & Lee, You-Na & Walsh, John P., 2018. "Funding model and creativity in science: Competitive versus block funding and status contingency effects," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(6), pages 1070-1083.
    3. Lawson, Cornelia & Geuna, Aldo & Finardi, Ugo, 2021. "The funding-productivity-gender nexus in science, a multistage analysis," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(3).
    4. Nicolas CARAYOL & Marianne LANOË, 2017. "The Impact of Project-Based Funding in Science: \r\nLessons from the ANR Experience," Cahiers du GREThA (2007-2019) 2017-04, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée (GREThA).
    5. Baruffaldi, Stefano H. & Marino, Marianna & Visentin, Fabiana, 2020. "Money to move: The effect on researchers of an international mobility grant," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(8).
    6. José Miguel Benavente & Gustavo Crespi & Alessandro Maffioli, 2007. "The Impact of National Research Funds: An Evaluation of the Chilean FONDECYT," OVE Working Papers 0307, Inter-American Development Bank, Office of Evaluation and Oversight (OVE).
    7. Pierre Courtioux & François Métivier & Antoine Reberioux, 2019. "Scientific Competition between Countries: Did China Get What It Paid for?," Post-Print halshs-02307534, HAL.
    8. Hu, Albert G.Z., 2020. "Public funding and the ascent of Chinese science: Evidence from the National Natural Science Foundation of China," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(5).
    9. Anckaert, Paul-Emmanuel & Cassiman, David & Cassiman, Bruno, 2020. "Fostering practice-oriented and use-inspired science in biomedical research," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(2).
    10. ONISHI Koichiro & OWAN Hideo, 2020. "Heterogenous Impacts of National Research Grants on Academic Productivity," Discussion papers 20052, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    11. Adam Jaffe, 2008. "The “Science of Science Policy”: reflections on the important questions and the challenges they present," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 131-139, April.
    12. Daniel Chudnovsky & Andrés López & Martín Rossi & Diego Ubfal, 2006. "Evaluating a Program of Public Funding of Scientific Activity. A Case Study of FONCYT in Argentina," OVE Working Papers 1206, Inter-American Development Bank, Office of Evaluation and Oversight (OVE).
    13. Jacob, Brian A. & Lefgren, Lars, 2011. "The impact of research grant funding on scientific productivity," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(9-10), pages 1168-1177, October.
    14. Gregory Price, 2007. "Would Increased National Science Foundation Research Support To Economists At Historically Black College And Universities Increase Their Research Productivity?," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 34(1), pages 87-109, June.
    15. Baruffaldi, Stefano & Visentin, Fabiana & Conti, Annamaria, 2016. "The productivity of science & engineering PhD students hired from supervisors’ networks," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 785-796.
    16. Ngoie, Jacques Kibambe, 2014. "Federal research spending and innovation in the U.S. economy," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 492-506.
    17. Graddy-Reed, Alexandra & Lanahan, Lauren & D'Agostino, Jesse, 2021. "Training across the academy: The impact of R&D funding on graduate students," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(5).
    18. Ayoubi, Charles & Pezzoni, Michele & Visentin, Fabiana, 2019. "The important thing is not to win, it is to take part: What if scientists benefit from participating in research grant competitions?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 84-97.
    19. Jörg Neufeld, 2016. "Determining effects of individual research grants on publication output and impact: The case of the Emmy Noether Programme (German Research Foundation)," Research Evaluation, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(1), pages 50-61.
    20. Kanybek Nur-tegin & Sanjay Venugopalan & Jessica Young, 2020. "Teaching Load and Other Determinants of Research Output Among University Faculty," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 65(2), pages 300-311, October.
    21. Li, Kai & Yan, Erjia, 2019. "Are NIH-funded publications fulfilling the proposed research? An examination of concept-matchedness between NIH research grants and their supported publications," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 226-237.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • L1 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance
    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior

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