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Sources of Fluctuations in the Boston Economy

Author

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  • Coulson, N.E.
  • Rushen, S.F.

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Coulson, N.E. & Rushen, S.F., 1993. "Sources of Fluctuations in the Boston Economy," Papers 4-93-5, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:pensta:4-93-5
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    Cited by:

    1. Chang, Sheng-Wen & Coulson, N. Edward, 2001. "Sources of Sectoral Employment Fluctuations in Central Cities and Suburbs: Evidence from Four Eastern U.S. Cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 199-218, March.
    2. Shu-hen Chiang, 2012. "The sources of metropolitan unemployment fluctuations in the Greater Taipei metropolitan area," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 91(4), pages 775-793, November.
    3. Donatella Baiardi & Carluccio Bianchi, 2010. "Un Indicatore di Attività Economica per la Lombardia e per le Province di Milano e Pavia," Quaderni di Dipartimento 130, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods.
    4. Rushen, Steven F., 1998. "The Role of the Automotive Industry in Detroit's Employment Fluctuations: A Multiple Restriction Regime Approach," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 28(1), pages 27-46, Summer.
    5. Gerald A. Carlino & Keith Sill, 1998. "The cyclical behavior of regional per capita incomes in the postwar period," Working Papers 98-11, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    6. Coulson, N. Edward, 1999. "Sectoral sources of metropolitan growth," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 723-743, November.
    7. Bound, John & Holzer, Harry J, 2000. "Demand Shifts, Population Adjustments, and Labor Market Outcomes during the 1980s," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(1), pages 20-54, January.
    8. Donatella Baiardi & Carluccio Bianchi, 2012. "Un Indicatore per la Lombardia e per le Province di Milano e Pavia (Nuova versione)," Quaderni di Dipartimento 158, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods.
    9. Gerald A. Carlino & Keith Sill, 1997. "Regional economies: separating trends from cycles," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue May, pages 19-31.
    10. Carlino, Gerald A. & DeFina, Robert H., 2004. "How strong is co-movement in employment over the business cycle? Evidence from state/sector data," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 298-315, March.
    11. Sei-Wan Kim & Radha Bhattacharya, 2009. "Regional Housing Prices in the USA: An Empirical Investigation of Nonlinearity," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 38(4), pages 443-460, May.
    12. Jonathan McCarthy & Charles Steindel, 1996. "The relative importance of national and regional factors in the New York Metropolitan economy," Research Paper 9621, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

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    Keywords

    business cycles ; inflation;

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