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Measuring the economic impacts of transgenic crops in developing agriculture during the first decade: Approaches, findings, and future directions

Author

Listed:
  • Smale, Melinda
  • Zambrano, Patricia
  • Gruère, Guillaume
  • Falck-Zepeda, José
  • Matuschke, Ira
  • Horna, Daniela
  • Nagarajan, Latha
  • Yerramareddy, Indira
  • Jones, Hannah

Abstract

"As progressively more farmers in developing countries begin using biotech crops, careful evaluation of such crops' benefits becomes ever more important. This food policy review examines the applied economics literature regarding the impact of biotech crops on non-industrialized agriculture and investigates the research methods used in assessing how these crops affect farmers, consumers, the agricultural sector as a whole, and international trade. This analysis offers a tool for researchers who seek to produce objective, relevant analysis of emerging crop biotechnologies that can in turn be used by national policymakers in developing countries. A vast literature has accumulated since transgenic crop varieties were initially released to farmers in 1996. Several years after their introduction in the United States, crop varieties with transgenic resistance to insects or herbicide tolerance were supplied to farmers in countries with developing economies and nonindustrialized agriculture. Essays, editorials, newsletters, web conferences, articles, and books have argued the pros and cons of transgenic crops. The global debate continues in this second decade of their use. A comparatively minor segment of this literature consists of studies conducted by agricultural economists to measure the impact of transgenic crop varieties on farmers, the size and distribution of the economic benefits from adopting them, consumer attitudes toward products made with transgenic ingredients, and implications of the use of transgenic crops for international trade. An even smaller subset treats the impacts of transgenic crops in developing economies." "Authors' Abstract

Suggested Citation

  • Smale, Melinda & Zambrano, Patricia & Gruère, Guillaume & Falck-Zepeda, José & Matuschke, Ira & Horna, Daniela & Nagarajan, Latha & Yerramareddy, Indira & Jones, Hannah, 2009. "Measuring the economic impacts of transgenic crops in developing agriculture during the first decade: Approaches, findings, and future directions," Food policy reviews 10, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:fprevi:10
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    Cited by:

    1. Matthew Schnurr & Sarah Mujabi-Mujuzi, 2014. "“No one asks for a meal they’ve never eaten.” Or, do African farmers want genetically modified crops?," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 31(4), pages 643-648, December.
    2. Falck-Zepeda, Jose & Smyth, Stuart J. & Ludlow, Karinne, 2016. "Zen and the Art of Attaining Conceptual and Implementation Clarity: Socio-economic Considerations, Biosafety and Decision-making," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 17(2).
    3. Vijesh Krishna & Matin Qaim & David Zilberman, 2016. "Transgenic crops, production risk and agrobiodiversity," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 43(1), pages 137-164.
    4. Takeshima Hiroyuki & Gruère Guillaume P, 2011. "Pressure Group Competition and GMO Regulations in Sub-Saharan Africa - Insights from the Becker Model," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-19, July.
    5. Stone, Glenn Davis, 2011. "Field versus Farm in Warangal: Bt Cotton, Higher Yields, and Larger Questions," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 387-398, March.
    6. Raney, Terri & Matuschke, Ira, 2010. "Genetically Modified Crops In Developing Countries: Back To The Future," 14th ICABR Conference, June 16-18, 2010, Ravello, Italy 188106, International Consortium on Applied Bioeconomy Research (ICABR).
    7. repec:spr:agrhuv:v:35:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s10460-017-9842-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. De Groote, Hugo & Gitonga, Zachary & Kimenju, Simon & Keter, Fredric & Ngigi, Obadiah, 2015. "But what do rural consumers in Africa think about GM food?," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211565, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    9. Huang, Jikun & Chen, Ruijian & Qiao, Fangbin & Wu, Kongming, 2015. "Biosafety management and pesticide use in China's Bt cotton production," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 67-75.
    10. Falck-Zepeda, Jose & Mnyulwa, Shumba & Mulenga, Dorothy & Gouse, Marnus & Masanganise, Patricia, 2010. "The Status of the Inclusion of Socio-Economic Considerations in Biosafety Regulations and Biotechnology Decision Making Processes in Southern and East Africa: Practical Implications and Consequences f," 14th ICABR Conference, June 16-18, 2010, Ravello, Italy 188422, International Consortium on Applied Bioeconomy Research (ICABR).
    11. Falck-Zepeda, Jose & Mnyulwa, Doreen & Mulenga, Dorothy & Gouse, Marnus & Masanganise, Patricia, 2010. "The Status of the Inclusion of Socio-Economic Considerations in Biosafety Regulations and Biotechnology Decision Making Processes in Southern and East Africa: Practical Implications and Consequences f," 14th ICABR Conference, June 16-18, 2010, Ravello, Italy 188118, International Consortium on Applied Bioeconomy Research (ICABR).
    12. Smyth, Stuart J. & Falck-Zepeda, Jose, 2013. "Socio-economic Considerations and International Trade Agreements," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 14(1).
    13. Falck-Zepeda, Jose Benjamin & Zambrano, Patricia, 2013. "Estimates and implications of the costs of compliance with biosafety regulations for African agriculture," IFPRI book chapters,in: Falck-Zepeda, Jose Benjamin & Gruère, Guillaume P. & Sithole-Niang, Idah (ed.), Genetically modified crops in Africa: Economic and policy lessons from countries south of the Sahara, chapter 6, pages 159-182 International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    14. Yorobe Jr., J.M. & Rejesus, R.M. & Hammig, M.D., 2011. "Insecticide use impacts of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Farmer Field Schools: Evidence from onion farmers in the Philippines," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 104(7), pages 580-587, September.
    15. Falck-Zepeda, Jose Benjamin & Gruère, Guillaume P. & Sithole-Niang, Idah (ed.), 2013. "Genetically modified crops in Africa: Economic and policy lessons from countries south of the Sahara," IFPRI books, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), number 978-0-89629-795-1.
    16. Ward, Patrick S. & Ortega, David L. & Spielman, David J. & Singh, Vartika, 2014. "Heterogeneous Demand for Drought-Tolerant Rice: Evidence from Bihar, India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 125-139.
    17. Chellattan Veettil, Prakashan & Krishna, Vijesh V. & Qaim, Matin, 2014. "Bt Cotton and Ecosystem Impacts of Pesticide Reductions," Discussion Papers 180977, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    18. Spielman, David J. & Zambrano, Patricia, 2013. "Policy, investment, and partnerships for agricultural biotechnology research in Africa: Emerging evidence," IFPRI book chapters,in: Falck-Zepeda, Jose Benjamin & Gruère, Guillaume P. & Sithole-Niang, Idah (ed.), Genetically modified crops in Africa: Economic and policy lessons from countries south of the Sahara, chapter 7, pages 183-205 International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    19. Guillaume Gruere & Debdatta Sengupta, 2011. "Bt Cotton and Farmer Suicides in India: An Evidence-based Assessment," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(2), pages 316-337.

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    Keywords

    biotechnology; Transgenic plants; Genetically modified crops; Economic impacts; Review methods; Review briefs; Review findings;

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