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Pathways of development in the hillsides of Honduras: causes and implications for agricultural production, poverty, and sustainable resource use

Author

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  • Pender, John L.
  • Scherr, Sara J.
  • Durón, Guadalupe

Abstract

Based on a survey of 48 communities in central Honduras, this paper identifies the major pathways of development that have been occurring in central Honduras since the mid-1970s, their causes and implications for agricultural productivity, natural resource sustainability, and poverty. Six pathways of development were identified: 1) basic grains expansion communities-where basic grains production is the dominant activity and increased basic grains production has occurred; 2) basic grains stagnation communities-where basic grains production is dominant but has stagnated or declined; 3) coffee expansion communities-where coffee production is important and has been increasing in importance; 4) horticultural expansion communities-where substantial adoption and expansion of horticultural crops has occurred; 5) forestry specialization communities-where forestry activities are important and basic grains production is stagnant or declining; and 6) nonfarm employment communities-where nonfarm employment is a major and increasing source of income. The findings imply that a “one-size-fits-all” approach to technical assistance is unlikely to be successful, since different approaches show promise in different pathways.

Suggested Citation

  • Pender, John L. & Scherr, Sara J. & Durón, Guadalupe, 1999. "Pathways of development in the hillsides of Honduras: causes and implications for agricultural production, poverty, and sustainable resource use," EPTD discussion papers 45, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:eptddp:45
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    File URL: http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/eptdp45.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Pender, John L., 1998. "Population growth, agricultural intensification, induced innovation and natural resource sustainability: An application of neoclassical growth theory," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 19(1-2), pages 99-112, September.
    4. Pender, John L. & Place, Frank & Ehui, Simeon K., 1999. "Strategies for sustainable agricultural development in the East African highlands:," EPTD discussion papers 41, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Stefano Pagiola, 1996. "Price policy and returns to soil conservation in semi-arid Kenya," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 8(3), pages 225-271, October.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Barbier, Bruno & Bergeron, Gilles, 2001. "Natural resource management in the hillsides of Honduras: bioeconomic modeling at the micro-watershed level," Research reports 123, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Jagger, Pamela & Pender, John L., 2003. "Impacts of programs and organizations on the adoption of sustainable land management technologies in Uganda:," EPTD discussion papers 101, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Place, Frank & Swallow, Brent M., 2000. "Assessing the relationships between property rights and technology adoption in smallholder agriculture: a review of issues and empirical methods," CAPRi working papers 2, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Tushemereirwe, Wilberforce K. & Kikulwe, Enoch M. & Rufino, Mariana & Kuyvenhoven, Arie & Ruben, Ruerd & Bagamba, Fredrick & Kalyebara, Robert, 2004. "Determinants Of Resource Allocation In Low Input Agriculture: The Case Of Banana Production In Uganda," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20147, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    5. Muller, Daniel & Zeller, Manfred, 2002. "Land use dynamics in the central highlands of Vietnam: a spatial model combining village survey data with satellite imagery interpretation," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 27(3), November.
    6. Chamberlin, Jordan & Pender, John & Yu, Bingxin, 2006. "Development domains for Ethiopia: capturing the geographical context of smallholder development options," EPTD discussion papers 159, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. McCarthy, Nancy & Dutilly-Diane, Celine & Drabo, Boureima & Kamara, Abdul & Vanderlinden, Jean-Paul, 2004. "Managing resources in erratic environments: an analysis of pastoralist systems in Ethiopia, Niger, and Burkina Faso," Research reports 135, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Pender, John L. & Scherr, Sara J., 1999. "Organizational development and natural resource management: evidence from central Honduras," EPTD discussion papers 49, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Hans G.P. Jansen & Paul B. Siegel & Jeffrey Alwang & Francisco Pichón, 2005. "Geography, Livelihoods and Rural Poverty in Honduras: An Empirical Analysis using an Asset-base Approach," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 134, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
    10. Pender, John L., 1999. "Rural population growth, agricultural change and natural resource management in developing countries: a review of hypotheses and some evidence from Honduras," EPTD discussion papers 48, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    11. Jansen, Hans G.P. & Siegel, Paul B. & Pichón, Francisco, 2005. "Identifying the drivers of sustainable rural growth and poverty reduction in Honduras," DSGD discussion papers 19, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    12. Scherr, Sara J., 2000. "A downward spiral? Research evidence on the relationship between poverty and natural resource degradation," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 479-498, August.

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