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Monetary policy and the U.S. and regions: some implications for European Monetary Union

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  • Gerald A. Carlino
  • Robert H. DeFina

Abstract

Under the European Monetary Union (EMU), member countries will be subject to common monetary policy shocks. Given the diversity in the economic and financial structures across the EMU economies, these common monetary shocks can be reasonably expected to have different effects. Little is known about what differences might arise, however, given the absence of any historical experience in Europe with a common currency. ; An alternative approach is to draw upon the historical experience of monetary policy's impacts on sub-national regions in the United States. Like the countries of the EMU, U.S. states and regions differ in industry mix and financial composition, while at the same time, they employ a common currency. Thus, the lessons learned from the U.S. experience provide valuable information about the potentially varied effects of a common monetary policy across EMU economies. ; In this paper, the authors use earlier findings to construct an index that ranks EMU countries by their likely sensitivity to a common monetary shock. The index indicates that countries fall into one of three groups: Finland, Ireland, and Spain are likely to be most responsive to monetary policy shocks; France, Italy, and the Netherlands will have a relatively small response; and Austria, Belgium, Portugal, Germany, and Luxembourg are likely to have a response close to the EMU average.

Suggested Citation

  • Gerald A. Carlino & Robert H. DeFina, 1998. "Monetary policy and the U.S. and regions: some implications for European Monetary Union," Working Papers 98-17, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedpwp:98-17
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Carlos Rodriguez-Fuentes & Sheila Dow, 2003. "EMU and the Regional Impact of Monetary Policy," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(9), pages 969-980.
    2. Fabio Bagliano & Alessandro Sembenelli, 2004. "The cyclical behaviour of inventories: European cross-country evidence from the early 1990s recession," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(18), pages 2031-2044.
    3. Andrew Hughes Hallett & Diana N. Weymark, 2001. "The Cost of Heterogeneity in a Monetary Union," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0128, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
    4. Casella, A., 2000. "Games for Central Bankers, Markets v/s Politics in Public Policy Decisions," G.R.E.Q.A.M. 00a02, Universite Aix-Marseille III.
    5. Dedola, Luca & Lippi, Francesco, 2005. "The monetary transmission mechanism: Evidence from the industries of five OECD countries," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(6), pages 1543-1569, August.
    6. Andrew Hughes Hallett & Laura Piscitelli, 1999. "EMU in Reality: The Effect of a Common Monetary Policy on Economies with Different Transmission Mechanisms," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 26(4), pages 337-358, December.
    7. Ivo J.M. Arnold, 2013. "The industry effects of monetary policy and their welfare implications," Banca Nazionale del Lavoro Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 53(214), pages 287-315.
    8. Andreas Worms, 2003. "Interbank Relationships and the Credit Channel in Germany," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 30(2), pages 179-198, June.
    9. Andrew Hughes Hallett & Christian Richter, 2009. "Has there been any structural convergence in the transmission of European monetary policies?," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 6(2), pages 85-101, July.
    10. Valter Di Giacinto, 2003. "Differential Regional Effects of Monetary Policy: A Geographical SVAR Approach," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 26(3), pages 313-341, July.
    11. Gerald A. Carlino & Robert H. DeFina, 1999. "Do states respond differently to changes in monetary policy?," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Jul, pages 17-27.
    12. Michael J. Artis, 2000. "The UK and the EMU," EUI-RSCAS Working Papers 67, European University Institute (EUI), Robert Schuman Centre of Advanced Studies (RSCAS).
    13. Ramos, Raul & Clar, Miquel & Surinach, Jordi, 1999. "EMU: some unanswered questions," ERSA conference papers ersa99pa220, European Regional Science Association.
    14. Jürgen von Hagen, 2007. "Institutionelle Gestaltung föderaler Systeme: Theorie und Empirie," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 8(2), pages 109-109, March.
    15. Alexis Penot, 2002. "Appréciations et conséquences possibles de l'hétérogénéité structurelle de la zone euro," Revue d'Économie Financière, Programme National Persée, vol. 65(1), pages 153-175.
    16. K. Raabe & I. Arnold & C.J.M. Kool, 2006. "Firm Size and Monetary Policy Transmission: A Theoretical Model on the Role of Capital Investment Expenditures," Working Papers 06-14, Utrecht School of Economics.
    17. Cornelius Bähr & Ulrike Stierle-von Schütz & Matthias Wrede, 2007. "Dezentralisierung in den EU-Staaten und räumliche Verteilung wirtschaftlicher Aktivitäten," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 8(2), pages 110-129, March.
    18. Andrew Hughes Hallett & Laura Piscitelli, 2002. "Does One Size Fit All? A currency union with asymmetric transmissions and a stability pact," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1), pages 71-96.
    19. Hallet, Martin, 1999. "The Impact of EMU on cohesion - further research needed?," ERSA conference papers ersa99pa087, European Regional Science Association.
    20. Gogas, Periklis & Kothroulas, George, 2009. "Two speed Europe and business cycle synchronization in the European Union: The effect of the common currency," MPRA Paper 13909, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    Keywords

    Monetary unions - European Union countries ; Monetary policy;

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