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Channel systems: Why is there a positive spread?

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  • Aleksander Berentsen
  • Alessandro Marchesiani
  • Christopher J. Waller

Abstract

An increasing number of central banks implement monetary policy via two standing facilities: a lending facility and a deposit facility. In this paper we show that it is socially optimal to implement a non-zero interest rate spread. We prove this result in a dynamic general equilibrium model where market participants have heterogeneous liquidity needs and where the central bank requires government bonds as collateral. We also calibrate the model and discuss the behavior of the money market rate and the volumes traded at the ECB’s deposit and lending facilities in response to the recent financial crisis.

Suggested Citation

  • Aleksander Berentsen & Alessandro Marchesiani & Christopher J. Waller, 2010. "Channel systems: Why is there a positive spread?," Working Papers 2010-049, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:2010-049
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kocherlakota, Narayana R., 2003. "Societal benefits of illiquid bonds," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 108(2), pages 179-193, February.
    2. Shi, Shouyong, 2008. "Efficiency improvement from restricting the liquidity of nominal bonds," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(6), pages 1025-1037, September.
    3. Kocherlakota, Narayana R., 1998. "Money Is Memory," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 232-251, August.
    4. Martin, Antoine & Monnet, Cyril, 2011. "Monetary Policy Implementation Frameworks: A Comparative Analysis," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(S1), pages 145-189, April.
    5. Ricardo Lagos & Randall Wright, 2005. "A Unified Framework for Monetary Theory and Policy Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(3), pages 463-484, June.
    6. Andolfatto, David, 2010. "Essential interest-bearing money," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 145(4), pages 1495-1507, July.
    7. Lagos, Ricardo & Rocheteau, Guillaume, 2008. "Money and capital as competing media of exchange," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 142(1), pages 247-258, September.
    8. Benjamin Lester & Andrew Postlewaite & Randall Wright, 2011. "Information and Liquidity," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43, pages 355-377, October.
    9. Cúrdia, Vasco & Woodford, Michael, 2011. "The central-bank balance sheet as an instrument of monetarypolicy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 54-79, January.
    10. Berentsen, Aleksander & Monnet, Cyril, 2008. "Monetary policy in a channel system," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(6), pages 1067-1080, September.
    11. Wallace, Neil, 2001. "Whither Monetary Economics?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 42(4), pages 847-869, November.
    12. Ricardo Lagos, 2010. "Asset prices, liquidity, and monetary policy in the search theory of money," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue July, pages 14-20.
    13. Araujo, Luis, 2004. "Social norms and money," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 241-256, March.
    14. Aleksander Berentsen & Christopher Waller, 2008. "Outside Versus Inside Bonds," IEW - Working Papers 372, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    15. Lagos, Ricardo, 2010. "Some results on the optimality and implementation of the Friedman rule in the Search Theory of Money," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 145(4), pages 1508-1524, July.
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    1. repec:agr:journl:v:4(605):y:2015:i:4(605):p:133-144 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:agr:journl:v:4(605):y:2015:i:4(605):p:135-146 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Umit BULUT, 2015. "The Interest Rate Corridor as a Macroprudential Tool to Mitigate Rapid Growth in Credits: Evidence from Turkey," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(4(605), W), pages 133-144, Winter.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monetary policy ; Open market operations ; Banks and banking; Central;

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • E59 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Other

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