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Has monetary policy become less effective?

  • Joseph H. Haslag

High-powered money has been declining relative to nominal GDP in the United States. Does the ability of monetary policy to affect aggregate activity decline as the money-income ratio falls? In this paper, I specify simple model economy, examining the effects that monetary policy actions and financial innovation would have on the equilibrium money-income ratio. The downward trend in the money-income ratio can be accounted for by increasing inflation, falling reserve requirements, or steady financial development. Whereas higher inflation and falling reserve requirements would reduce the potency of monetary policy, monetary policy's effects are invariant to financial innovation.

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File URL: http://www.dallasfed.org/assets/documents/research/papers/1999/wp9906.pdf
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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas in its series Working Papers with number 9906.

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Date of creation: 1999
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Handle: RePEc:fip:feddwp:99-06
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  1. Harold L. Cole & Lee E. Ohanian, 1998. "The demand for money and the nonneutrality of money," Staff Report 246, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  2. Ireland, Peter N, 1995. "Endogenous Financial Innovation and the Demand for Money," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 27(1), pages 107-23, February.
  3. David B. Gordon & Eric M. Leeper & Tao Zha, 1997. "Trends in velocity and policy expectations," FRB Atlanta Working Paper No. 97-7, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  4. Bansal, Ravi & Coleman, Wilbur John, II, 1996. "A Monetary Explanation of the Equity Premium, Term Premium, and Risk-Free Rate Puzzles," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(6), pages 1135-71, December.
  5. Stockman, Alan C., 1981. "Anticipated inflation and the capital stock in a cash in-advance economy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 387-393.
  6. Gertler, Mark, 1988. "Financial Structure and Aggregate Economic Activity: An Overview," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 20(3), pages 559-88, August.
  7. Brunner, Karl & Meltzer, Allan H, 1972. "Money, Debt, and Economic Activity," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(5), pages 951-77, Sept.-Oct.
  8. McGrattan, Ellen R., 1998. "Trends in velocity and policy expectations : A comment," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 305-316, December.
  9. Joseph H. Haslag & Eric R. Young, 1998. "Money Creation, Reserve Requirements, and Seigniorage," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 1(3), pages 677-698, July.
  10. Woodford, Michael, 1990. "The optimum quantity of money," Handbook of Monetary Economics, in: B. M. Friedman & F. H. Hahn (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 20, pages 1067-1152 Elsevier.
  11. Lacker, Jeffrey M. & Schreft, Stacey L., 1996. "Money and credit as means of payment," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 3-23, August.
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