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Race, wages, and assimilation among Cuban immigrants

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  • Madeline Zavodny

Abstract

This study uses data from the 1980 and 1990 Census and the 1994-2000 Current Population Survey to examine the determinants of earnings among male Cuban immigrants in the United States by race. Nonwhite Cuban immigrants earn about 15 percent less than whites, on average. Much of the racial wage gap is due to differences in educational attainment, age at migration, and years in the United States, but the gap remains at almost 4 percent after controlling for such factors. Nonwhite Cuban immigrants also have lower returns to education than whites. A comparison to white, non-Hispanic U.S. natives indicates that nonwhite Cubans not only earn less initially than white Cubans on arrival in the United States but also do not significantly close the racial earnings gap over time.

Suggested Citation

  • Madeline Zavodny, 2003. "Race, wages, and assimilation among Cuban immigrants," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2003-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:2003-10
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    File URL: http://www.frbatlanta.org/filelegacydocs/wp0310.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Cornwell, Christopher & Rupert, Peter, 1997. "Unobservable Individual Effects, Marriage and the Earnings of Young Men," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(2), pages 285-294, April.
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    4. Chiswick, Barry R & Miller, Paul W, 1995. "The Endogeneity between Language and Earnings: International Analyses," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(2), pages 246-288, April.
    5. Borjas, George J, 1985. "Assimilation, Changes in Cohort Quality, and the Earnings of Immigrants," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(4), pages 463-489, October.
    6. Nasser Daneshvary & R. Schwer, 1994. "Black immigrants in the U.S. labor market: An earnings analysis," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 22(3), pages 77-98, March.
    7. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
    8. Darren Lubotsky, 2007. "Chutes or Ladders? A Longitudinal Analysis of Immigrant Earnings," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115(5), pages 820-867, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Carl Lin, 2016. "How Do Immigrants From Taiwan Fare In The U.S. Labor Market?," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 61(05), pages 1-38, December.
    2. repec:jfr:rwe111:v:7:y:2016:i:1:p:95-106 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Catalina Franco Buitrago, 2010. "Latin American Immigration in the United States: Is There Wage Assimilation Across the Wage Distribution?," ARCHIVOS DE ECONOMÍA 006447, DEPARTAMENTO NACIONAL DE PLANEACIÓN.

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    Keywords

    Immigrants ; Employment (Economic theory) ; Discrimination in employment;

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