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Latin American Immigration in the United States: Is There Wage Assimilation Across the Wage Distribution?

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  • Catalina Franco Buitrago

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Abstract

Immigration has been one of the main driving forces that have contributed to shape the United States as it is today. The current wave of immigration started in 1965 and has different characteristics to the previous inflows of immigrants1.In particular, the 1965 Immigration Act had an impact in shifting the national origin of U.S. immigrants mostly to Latin Americans and Asians, widening therefore the gap between natives and immigrants in terms of language and culture (Card, 2005). Since immigration from Latin America has constituted between 40 and 50 percent of total immigration in the current wave, and giventhat Latin Americans are relatively less skilled than U.S. natives and other immigrants, it is worth studying the wage differentials that potentially exist between natives and Latin American immigrants.

Suggested Citation

  • Catalina Franco Buitrago, 2010. "Latin American Immigration in the United States: Is There Wage Assimilation Across the Wage Distribution?," ARCHIVOS DE ECONOMÍA 006447, DEPARTAMENTO NACIONAL DE PLANEACIÓN.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000118:006447
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    1. Robert J. LaLonde & Robert H. Topel, 1992. "The Assimilation of Immigrants in the U. S. Labor Market," NBER Chapters,in: Immigration and the Workforce: Economic Consequences for the United States and Source Areas, pages 67-92 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. David Card & Ethan G. Lewis, 2007. "The Diffusion of Mexican Immigrants During the 1990s: Explanations and Impacts," NBER Chapters,in: Mexican Immigration to the United States, pages 193-228 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Orrenius, Pia M. & Zavodny, Madeline, 2007. "Does immigration affect wages? A look at occupation-level evidence," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(5), pages 757-773, October.
    4. David Card, 2005. "Is the New Immigration Really so Bad?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(507), pages 300-323, November.
    5. Madeline Zavodny, 2003. "Race, wages, and assimilation among Cuban immigrants," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2003-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    6. Chiswick, Barry R, 1978. "The Effect of Americanization on the Earnings of Foreign-born Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 897-921, October.
    7. Albert Saiz, 2003. "The impact of immigration on American cities: an introduction to the issues," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q4, pages 14-23.
    8. Pia M. Orrenius & Alan D. Viard, 2000. "The second great migration: economic and policy implications," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue May, pages 1-8.
    9. Chiswick, Barry R. & Le, Anh T. & Miller, Paul W., 2006. "How Immigrants Fare Across the Earnings Distribution: International Analyses," IZA Discussion Papers 2405, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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