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Access to Modern Energy: a Review of Barriers, Drivers and Impacts

Author

Listed:
  • Jacopo Bonan

    (Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM))

  • Stefano Pareglio

    (Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore and Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM))

  • Massimo Tavoni

    (Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM) and Politecnico di Milano)

Abstract

Universal access to modern energy services, in terms of access to electricity and to modern cooking facilities, has been recognized as a fundamental challenge for development. Despite strong praise for action and the deployment of large-scale electrification programs and improved cookstove (ICS) distribution campaigns, few studies have shed light on the barriers to, the enablers of and the impacts of access to energy on development outcomes, using rigorous methodologies. This paper reviews this recent strand of research, trying to fill these gaps. We focus on the demand-side and household perspective. Our main outcomes of interest are electricity connection and ICS adoption for the analysis of barriers, time allocation, labour market outcomes and welfare for the impact analysis. We provide evidence of significant wellbeing impacts of electrification, and mixed evidence for cookstoves.

Suggested Citation

  • Jacopo Bonan & Stefano Pareglio & Massimo Tavoni, 2016. "Access to Modern Energy: a Review of Barriers, Drivers and Impacts," Working Papers 2016.68, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  • Handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2016.68
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alem, Yonas & Hassen, Sied & Kohlin, Gunnar, 2013. "The Dynamics of Electric Cookstove Adoption: Panel Data Evidence from Ethiopia," Discussion Papers dp-13-03-efd, Resources For the Future.
    2. Nava Ashraf & James Berry & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2010. "Can Higher Prices Stimulate Product Use? Evidence from a Field Experiment in Zambia," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(5), pages 2383-2413, December.
    3. Hunt Allcott & Allan Collard-Wexler & Stephen D. O'Connell, 2016. "How Do Electricity Shortages Affect Industry? Evidence from India," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(3), pages 587-624, March.
    4. Ahlborg, Helene & Hammar, Linus, 2014. "Drivers and barriers to rural electrification in Tanzania and Mozambique – Grid-extension, off-grid, and renewable energy technologies," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 117-124.
    5. Achyuta Adhvaryu & Namrata Kala & Anant Nyshadham, 2018. "The Light and the Heat: Productivity Co-benefits of Energy-saving Technology," NBER Working Papers 24314, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jacopo Bonan & Pietro Battiston & Jaimie Bleck & Philippe LeMay-Boucher & Stefano Pareglio & Bassirou Sarr & Massimo Tavoni, 2017. "Social Interaction and Technology Adoption: Experimental Evidence from Improved Cookstoves in Mali," Working Papers 2017.47, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    2. repec:ebl:ecbull:eb-17-00357 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Impact Evaluation; Energy Poverty; Energy Access; Rural Electrification; Modern Cookstoves; Literature Review;

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • Q4 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy

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