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Bienes comerciables y no comerciables en la economía española: Un enfoque de ciclo real

  • José Mª Martín Moreno
  • Jesús Ruiz

En este trabajo se analizan las consecuencias de incorporar bienes comerciables, no comerciables y de inversión en un modelo de ciclo real para una economía abierta y pequeña aplicado a la economía española. La simulaciones estocásticas del modelo bajo el supuesto de expectativas racionales y su comparación con los datos de la economía española muestran que el modelo teórico explica algunos hechos estilizados de dicha economía como son: i) el puzzle Dolado et al. es decir, la alta volatilidad del consumo privado para nuestra economía, y ii) las características cíclicas del fenómeno conocido como “inflación dual”. Además el modelo teórico explica adecuadamente gran parte de las otras propiedades cíclicas de las variables macroeconómicas españolas tanto a nivel agregado como sectorial.

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Paper provided by FEDEA in its series Studies on the Spanish Economy with number 206.

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Handle: RePEc:fda:fdaeee:206
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  12. Alan C. Stockman & Linda L. Tesar, 1990. "Tastes and Technology in a Two-Country Model of the Business Cycle: Explaining International Comovements," NBER Working Papers 3566, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Sims, Christopher A, 1990. "Solving the Stochastic Growth Model by Backsolving with a Particular Nonlinear Form for the Decision Rule," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 8(1), pages 45-47, January.
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