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Social protection benefits and growth: Evidence from the European Union

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  • José A. Herce
  • Simón Sosvilla-Rivero
  • Juan J. De Lucio

Abstract

Using a harmonized data set for the European Union and panel data techniques, and following a production function approach, we find a positive growth effect of total social protection expenditure on growth. When evaluating the effects of different programmes, the results are mixed.
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  • José A. Herce & Simón Sosvilla-Rivero & Juan J. De Lucio, "undated". "Social protection benefits and growth: Evidence from the European Union," Working Papers 98-01, FEDEA.
  • Handle: RePEc:fda:fdaddt:9801
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Oswald Andrew J., 1996. "A Conjecture on the Explanation for High Unemployment in the Industrialized Nations : Part I," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 475, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
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    3. Hansson, Par & Henrekson, Magnus, 1994. "A New Framework for Testing the Effect of Government Spending on Growth and Productivity," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 81(3-4), pages 381-401, December.
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    7. Ab Atkinson, 1996. "Growth and the welfare state Is the welfare state necessarily bad for economic growth?," New Economy, Institute for Public Policy Research, vol. 3(3), pages 182-186, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Simón Sosvilla-Rivero & José A. Herce & Juan-José. de Lucio, "undated". "Convergence in social protection across EU countries, 1970-1999," Working Papers 2003-01, FEDEA.
    2. Gómez Puig, Marta & Sosvilla-Rivero, Simón & Martínez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada, 2019. "Re-examining the debt-growth nexus: A grouped fixed-effect approach," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 374, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    3. Alessandro Crociata & Massimiliano Agovino & Donatella Furia & Giacomo Osmi & Nicola Mattoscio & Massimiliano Cerciello, 2020. "Impulse and time persistence of disaggregate welfare expenditure on growth in the EU," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 37(1), pages 13-38, April.
    4. Denis Bouget, 2009. "Trends of Social Welfare Systems : From Convergence to Attractiveness, an Exploratory Approach," Working Papers hal-00441889, HAL.
    5. Jesus Clemente & Carmen Marcuello & Antonio Montañes, 2012. "Government Social Spending and GDP: has there been a change in social policy?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(22), pages 2895-2905, August.

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