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Does the Stock Market Evaluate Intangible Assets? An empirical analysis using data of listed firms in Japan

  • MIYAGAWA Tsutomu
  • TAKIZAWA Miho
  • EDAMURA Kazuma
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    Following Corrado et al. (2009), we measure intangible assets at the listed firm level in Japan. Compared to the conventional Tobin's Q, the revised Q including intangibles is almost 1 on average, as suggested by Hall (2000 and 2001). The standard deviation of the revised Q is smaller than that of the conventional Q. Estimation results based on Bond and Cummins (2000) show that greater intangible assets increase firm value. In particular, in the IT industries, on average, Tobin's Q is higher than that in the non-IT industries, and the stock market reflects the value of intangibles in the IT industries. These results suggest that the government should adopt policies that promote investment, including intangibles in the IT industries, and change in the industry structure in Japan.

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    Paper provided by Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI) in its series Discussion papers with number 13052.

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    Length: 41 pages
    Date of creation: Jun 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:eti:dpaper:13052
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    1. Bloom, Nicholas & Van Reenen, John, 2006. "Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries," CEPR Discussion Papers 5581, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. FUKAO Kyoji & HAMAGATA Sumio & MIYAGAWA Tsutomu & TONOGI Konomi, 2007. "Intangible Investment in Japan: Measurement and Contribution to Economic Growth," Discussion papers 07034, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    3. Mauro Giorgio Marrano & Jonathan Haskel & Gavin Wallis, 2009. "What Happened To The Knowledge Economy? Ict, Intangible Investment, And Britain'S Productivity Record Revisited," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 55(3), pages 686-716, 09.
    4. Corrado, Carol & Haskel, Jonathan & Iommi, Massimiliano & Jona-Lasinio, Cecilia, 2012. "Intangible Capital and Growth in Advanced Economies: Measurement and Comparative Results," CEPR Discussion Papers 9061, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Hiroki Arato & Katsunori Yamada, 2012. "Japan's Intangible Capital and Valuation of Corporations in a Neoclassical Framework," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(4), pages 459-478, October.
    6. Charles R. Hulten & Xiaohui Hao, 2008. "What is a Company Really Worth? Intangible Capital and the "Market to Book Value" Puzzle," NBER Working Papers 14548, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Susanto Basu & John G. Fernald & Nicholas Oulton & Sylaja Srinivasan, 2003. "The Case of the Missing Productivity Growth: Or, Does Information Technology Explain why Productivity Accelerated in the US but not the UK?," NBER Working Papers 10010, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Carol Corrado & Charles Hulten & Daniel Sichel, 2009. "Intangible Capital And U.S. Economic Growth," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 55(3), pages 661-685, 09.
    9. Carol Corrado & John Haltiwanger & Dan Sichel, 2005. "Measuring Capital in the New Economy," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number corr05-1, May.
    10. FUKAO Kyoji & HAMAGATA Sumio & INUI Tomohiko & ITO Keiko & Hyeog Ug KWON & MAKINO Tatsuji & MIYAGAWA Tsutomu & NAKANISHI Yasuo & TOKUI Joji, 2007. "Estimation Procedures and TFP Analysis of the JIP Database 2006 Provisional Version," Discussion papers 07003, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
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