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Macroeconomic Effects of Oligopolistic Competition with Wage Bargaining

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  • Correa López, Mónica

Abstract

Modelling oligopoly in general equilibrium is about understanding the aggregate effects of the strategic behavior that nonatomistic agents may exhibit in their markets. Real-world economies appear to be characterized by (monopoly) power-endowed agents behaving strategically - namely, firms and unions. By abstracting from this behavior, we risk missing some important features of the macroeconomy. We develop a general equilibrium model of unionized oligopoly aimed at addressing this point. We evaluate the macroeconomic effects of supply-side shocks under alternative product and labor market structures. In addition, the micro foundations of the model capture an alternative channel for the development of strategic interactions among firms, unions and the monetary authority. This channel creates a transmission mechanism for real effects of monetary policy-related shocks, which we investigate. Finally, in the light of the predictions of the model, we discuss macroecomic performance in Continental Europe over the 1990s.

Suggested Citation

  • Correa López, Mónica, 2004. "Macroeconomic Effects of Oligopolistic Competition with Wage Bargaining," Economics Discussion Papers 8874, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:esx:essedp:8874
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    File URL: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/8874/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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