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Measuring the Environmental Impacts of Changing Trade Patterns on the Poor

Author

Listed:
  • Kaliappa Kalirajan
  • Venkatachalam Anbumozhi
  • Kanhaiya Singh

Abstract

It is an empirical fact that it is very difficult to balance economic growth, poverty reduction, and environment protection, particularly for developing and transitional economies. While the economic environment of a country is influenced by conditions within the country, it is also influenced by external shocks such as the recent global financial crisis depending on how integrated the country is with the rest of the world. Thus, it poses a continuing challenge for policy makers in developing and transitional countries to readjust the economic environment in a way that leads to better and more effective targeting of the chronic issue of poverty reduction without causing damage to the natural environment. It is in this context that this paper attempts to measure the environmental impact of changing trade patterns on the poor. [ADBI Working Paper 239]

Suggested Citation

  • Kaliappa Kalirajan & Venkatachalam Anbumozhi & Kanhaiya Singh, 2010. "Measuring the Environmental Impacts of Changing Trade Patterns on the Poor," Working Papers id:2945, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:2945
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Karsten Bjerring Olsen, 2006. "Productivity Impacts of Offshoring and Outsourcing: A Review," OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers 2006/1, OECD Publishing.
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    3. Ross Garnaut & Stephen Howes & Frank Jotzo & Peter Sheehan, 2008. "Emissions in the Platinum Age: the implications of rapid development for climate-change mitigation," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(2), pages 377-401, Summer.
    4. Reimer, Jeffrey J., 2002. "Estimating the poverty impacts of trade liberalization," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2790, The World Bank.
    5. Ronald Steenblik & Dominique Drouet & George Stubbs, 2005. "Synergies Between Trade in Environmental Services and Trade in Environmental Goods," OECD Trade and Environment Working Papers 2005/1, OECD Publishing.
    6. Mary Amiti & Caroline Freund, 2010. "The Anatomy of China's Export Growth," NBER Chapters,in: China's Growing Role in World Trade, pages 35-56 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Ronald Steenblik, 2005. "Liberalising Trade in 'Environmental Goods': Some Practical Considerations," OECD Trade and Environment Working Papers 2005/5, OECD Publishing.
    8. Masahiro Kawai, 1998. "The East Asian Currency Crisis: Causes And Lessons," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 16(2), pages 157-172, April.
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    10. Ronald Steenblik, 2005. "Environmental Goods: A Comparison of the APEC and OECD Lists," OECD Trade and Environment Working Papers 2005/4, OECD Publishing.
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    12. Ravallion, Martin & Datt, Gaurav, 1996. "How Important to India's Poor Is the Sectoral Composition of Economic Growth?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 10(1), pages 1-25, January.
    13. Steven Radelet & Jeffrey D. Sachs, 1998. "The East Asian Financial Crisis: Diagnosis, Remedies, Prospects," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 29(1), pages 1-90.
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    15. Copeland, Brian R & Taylor, M Scott, 1995. "Trade and Transboundary Pollution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(4), pages 716-737, September.
    16. Geoffrey J Bannister, 2001. "International Trade and Poverty Alleviation," IMF Working Papers 01/54, International Monetary Fund.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kaliappa Kalirajan,, 2012. "Regional Cooperation towards Green Asia : Trade and Investment," Development Economics Working Papers 23291, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    2. Kalirajan, Kaliappa, 2012. "Regional cooperation towards green Asia: Trade in low carbon goods and services," Working Papers 249395, Australian National University, Centre for Climate Economics & Policy.
    3. Anbumozhi, Venkatachalam & Kimura, Mari & Isono, Kumiko, 2011. "Leveraging Environment and Climate Change Initiatives for Corporate Excellence," ADBI Working Papers 335, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    4. Kaliappa Kalirajan & Venkatachalam Anbumozhi, 2014. "Regional Cooperation Toward Green Asia: Trade in Low Carbon Goods," The International Trade Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(4), pages 344-362, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic growth; poverty reduction; environment protection; financial crisis; environmental;

    JEL classification:

    • E20 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

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