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Competition and Collusion in Grain Markets: Basmati Auctions in North India

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  • A Banerji
  • J.V. Meenakshi

Abstract

Many small wholesale grain markets in India are characterized by large numbers of sellers and a relatively small number of buyers, thereby lending the price formation process open to manipulation through collusion. Government intervention limits the extent of such manipulation through the institution of regulated markets, where the rules of exchange are clearly spelled out and the price formation process is transparent. Unfortunately, recent studies that document how agricultural markets operate—especially in Northern India—and the extent to which they hinder or serve farmers, are rare. In this paper we attempt to fill this gap by studying the functioning of a regulated basmati paddy market in the state of Haryana in North India. [Working Paper No. 91]

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  • A Banerji & J.V. Meenakshi, 2010. "Competition and Collusion in Grain Markets: Basmati Auctions in North India," Working Papers id:2701, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:2701
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. James W. Friedman, 1971. "A Non-cooperative Equilibrium for Supergames," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(1), pages 1-12.
    4. Laffont, Jean-Jacques, 1997. "Game theory and empirical economics: The case of auction data 1," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 1-35, January.
    5. Mailath, George J. & Zemsky, Peter, 1991. "Collusion in second price auctions with heterogeneous bidders," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 467-486, November.
    6. Baldwin, Laura H & Marshall, Robert C & Richard, Jean-Francois, 1997. "Bidder Collusion at Forest Service Timber Sales," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(4), pages 657-699, August.
    7. Jha, Raghbendra & Murthy, K. V. B. & Nagarajan, Hari K. & Seth, Ashok, 1999. "Components of the wholesale bid-ask spread and the structure of grain markets: the case of rice in India," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 21(2), pages 173-189, October.
    8. Graham, Daniel A & Marshall, Robert C, 1987. "Collusive Bidder Behavior at Single-Object Second-Price and English Auctions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(6), pages 1217-1239, December.
    9. Hendricks, Kenneth & Porter, Robert H, 1988. "An Empirical Study of an Auction with Asymmetric Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(5), pages 865-883, December.
    10. Skrzypacz, A. & Hopenhayn, H., 1999. "Bidding Rings in Repeated Auctions," RCER Working Papers 463, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
    11. Nelson, Jon P., 1995. "Market structure and incomplete information: Price formation in a real-world repeated English auction," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 421-437, August.
    12. Sareen, Samita, 1999. "Posterior Odds Comparison of a Symmetric Low-Price, Sealed-Bid Auction within the Common-Value and the Independent-Private-Values Paradigms," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(6), pages 651-676, Nov.-Dec..
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    Keywords

    Wholesale; grain markets; manipulation; price formation; transparent; agricultural markets; basmati; paddy markets;

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