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Are Patients in the Transition World Paying Unofficially to Stay Longer in Hospital? Some Evidence from Kazakhstan

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  • Robin Thompson
  • Ana Xavier

Abstract

To empirically test whether, as surveys and anedoctal reports suggest, patients are paying to stay longer in hospital, perceived as resulting in better care (e.g. more professional attention), a unique dataset is constructed on hospital length of stay, severity, unofficial payments and socio-economic characteristics (age, gender, occupation and income) from a survey on 1508 trauma and surgical patients discharged from Almaty City (the former capital of Kazakhstan) three main hospitals between 1999 and 2000.

Suggested Citation

  • Robin Thompson & Ana Xavier, 2010. "Are Patients in the Transition World Paying Unofficially to Stay Longer in Hospital? Some Evidence from Kazakhstan," Working Papers id:2485, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:2485
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Liu, Yuanli & Rao, Keqin & Fei, John, 1998. "Economic transition and health transition: comparing China and Russia," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 103-122, May.
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    3. Robin Thompson & Ana Xavier, 2002. "Unofficial Payments for Acute State Hospital Care In Kazakhstan. A Model of Physician Behaviour with Price Discrimination and Vertical Service Differentiation," LICOS Discussion Papers 12402, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
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    7. Martin, Stephen & Smith, Peter, 1996. "Explaining variations in inpatient length of stay in the National Health Service," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 279-304, June.
    8. Delcheva, Evgenia & Balabanova, Dina & McKee, Martin, 1997. "Under-the-counter payments for health care: Evidence from Bulgaria," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 89-100, November.
    9. Barton H. Hamilton & Vivian H. Hamilton, 1997. "Estimating surgical volume—outcome relationships applying survival models: accounting for frailty and hospital fixed effects," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(4), pages 383-395, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Habibov, Nazim & Cheung, Alex, 2017. "Revisiting informal payments in 29 transitional countries: The scale and socio-economic correlates," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 178(C), pages 28-37.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender; age; occupation; patients; hospitals; care; kazakhstan; socio-economic;
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