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Climate Change and the Future Impacts of Storm-Surge Disasters in Developing Countries


  • Susmita Dasgupta
  • Benoit Laplante
  • Siobhan Murray
  • David Wheeler


The implications of sea-level rise and storm surges for 84 developing countries and 577 of their cyclone-vulnerable coastal cities with populations greater than 100,000 are explored. Combining the most recent scientific and demographic information, they estimate the future impact of climate change on storm surges that will strike coastal populations, economies, and ecosystems. Focus is on the distribution of heightened impacts, because the authors believe that greater knowledge of their probable variation will be useful for local and national planners, as well as international donors. [WP No. 182].

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  • Susmita Dasgupta & Benoit Laplante & Siobhan Murray & David Wheeler, 2010. "Climate Change and the Future Impacts of Storm-Surge Disasters in Developing Countries," Working Papers id:2437, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:2437
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    Cited by:

    1. Julia Kloos & Niklas Baumert, 2015. "Preventive resettlement in anticipation of sea level rise: a choice experiment from Alexandria, Egypt," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 76(1), pages 99-121, March.
    2. Simon J. Lloyd & R. Sari Kovats & Zaid Chalabi & Sally Brown & Robert J. Nicholls, 2016. "Modelling the influences of climate change-associated sea-level rise and socioeconomic development on future storm surge mortality," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 134(3), pages 441-455, February.


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