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Women, Paid Work and Empowerment in India: A Review of Evidence and Issues

  • Sunny Jose


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    The paper is an attempt to review critically the association between women’s paid work and empowerment in India. As a prelude, the author seek to assess the extent of women’s participation in paid work during the last three decades (section two), and offer a glimpse into the nature and quality of women’s work in India (section three). A discussion on the probable causes underlying women’s participation in paid work becomes necessary (section four) so as to assess and contextualise the empowering potentials of women’s paid work (section five). An attempt will also be made to reflect on the issues arising from the assessment with a view to suggest, if necessary, possible directions for further work (section six).[CWDS OP]

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    Paper provided by eSocialSciences in its series Working Papers with number id:2064.

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    Date of creation: Jun 2009
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    Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:2064
    Note: Institutional Papers
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    1. Shelah Bloom & David Wypij & Monica Gupta, 2001. "Dimensions of women’s autonomy and the influence on maternal health care utilization in a north indian city," Demography, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 67-78, February.
    2. Lupin Rahman & Vijayendra Rao, 2004. "The Determinants of Gender Equity in India: Examining Dyson and Moore's Thesis with New Data," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 30(2), pages 239-268.
    3. Shireen J. Jejeebhoy & Zeba A. Sathar, 2001. "Women's Autonomy in India and Pakistan: The Influence of Religion and Region," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 27(4), pages 687-712.
    4. Maitreyi Bordia Das, and Sonalde Desai, 2003. "Why are educated women less likely to be employed in India? Testing competing hypotheses," Social Protection Discussion Papers 27868, The World Bank.
    5. Jackson, Cecile, 1996. "Rescuing gender from the poverty trap," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 489-504, March.
    6. Geeta Gandhi Kingdon & Jeemol Unni, 2001. "Education and Women's Labour Market Outcomes in India," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 173-195.
    7. Wendy Olsen, 2006. "A Pluralist Account of Labour Participation in India," Economics Series Working Papers GPRG-WPS-042, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    8. Pradeep Kumar Panda, 1999. "Poverty and young women's employment: Linkages in Kerala," Centre for Development Studies, Trivendrum Working Papers 292, Centre for Development Studies, Trivendrum, India.
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