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Inequality in pupils' educational attainment: how much do family, sibling type and neighbourhood matter?

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  • Nicoletti, Cheti
  • Rabe, Birgitta

Abstract

We explore the relative influence of family and neighbourhood on educational attainment and how this varies by sibling type. Using English register data we find sibling correlations in exam scores of 0.563 at the end of primary school and of 0.621 at the end of compulsory schooling. The neighbourhood explains at most 10-15% of the variance in educational attainment; whereas the family explains at least 43%. This percentage is significantly higher for twins and for siblings of the same sex. It is also higher for closely spaced siblings and siblings with a similar school starting age but only at age 11.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicoletti, Cheti & Rabe, Birgitta, 2010. "Inequality in pupils' educational attainment: how much do family, sibling type and neighbourhood matter?," ISER Working Paper Series 2010-26, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2010-26
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2010-26.pdf
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    1. Sophia Rabe-Hesketh, 2010. "Biometrical modeling of twin and family data in Stata," German Stata Users' Group Meetings 2010 01, Stata Users Group.
    2. Birgitta Rabe & Mark Taylor, 2010. "Residential mobility, quality of neighbourhood and life course events," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 173(3), pages 531-555.
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    Cited by:

    1. Emily McDool, 2016. "The Effect of Primary Converter Academies on Pupil Performance," Working Papers 2016013, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.

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