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The Neofunctionalists Were (almost) Right: Politicization and European Integration

  • Lisbet Hooghe
  • Gary Marks
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    This paper examines the politicization of European integration. We begin by asking how neofunctionalism and its precursor, functionalism, conceive the politics of regional integration. Then we turn to the evidence of the past two decades and ask how politicization has, in fact, shaped the level, scope, and character of European integration.

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    Paper provided by University of Bath, Department of European Studies and Modern Languages in its series The Constitutionalism Web-Papers with number p0024.

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    Date of creation: 09 Aug 2005
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    Handle: RePEc:erp:conweb:p0024
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.bath.ac.uk/esml/

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    1. Hall, Peter A. & Soskice, David (ed.), 2001. "Varieties of Capitalism: The Institutional Foundations of Comparative Advantage," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199247752, March.
    2. Nye, J. S., 1970. "Comparing Common Markets: A Revised Neo-Functionalist Model," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 24(04), pages 796-835, September.
    3. Scharpf, Fritz W., 2001. "European governance: Common concerns vs. the challenge of diversity," MPIfG Working Paper 01/6, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    4. Schmitter, Philippe C., 1970. "A Revised Theory of Regional Integration," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 24(04), pages 836-868, September.
    5. Eichenberg, Richard C. & Dalton, Russell J., 1993. "Europeans and the European Community: the dynamics of public support for European integration," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 47(04), pages 507-534, September.
    6. Pollack, Mark A., 2003. "The Engines of European Integration: Delegation, Agency, and Agenda Setting in the EU," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199251179, March.
    7. Johan P. Olsen, 2004. "Unity, diversity and democratic institutions. What can we learn from the European Union as a large-scale experiment in political organization and governing?," ARENA Working Papers 13, ARENA.
    8. Haas, Ernst B., 1970. "The Study of Regional Integration: Reflections on the Joy and Anguish of Pretheorizing," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 24(04), pages 606-646, September.
    9. Haas, Ernst B., 1961. "International Integration: The European and the Universal Process," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(03), pages 366-392, June.
    10. MARK FRANKLIN & MICHAEL MARSH & LAUREN McLAREN, 1994. "Uncorking the Bottle: Popular Opposition to European Unification in the Wake of Maastricht," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(4), pages 455-472, December.
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